Emerging and Innovative Technologies

Oral

394357 - Performance of a Pilot-Scale Gas Sparged Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor: A Case Study

Monday, June 4
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Location: Lakeshore C
Co-Authors: Prathap Parameswaran, Manhattan, Kansas – Kansas State University; Patrick Evans, Bellevue, WA – CDM Smith; Tyler Penfield, Manhattan, KS – Kansas State University; Chad Olney, Manhattan, KS – Kansas State University; Bernadette Drouhard, Manhattan, KS – Kansas State University; Kristen Jones, Manhattan, KS – Kansas State University

Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR) are a potentially disruptive technology due to the energy advantages compared to their aerobic counterparts in wastewater treatment. Because they eliminate the energy intensive aeration process and produce biogas that can be used in cogeneration, the energy required to operate an AnMBR system is significantly lowered, and the potential exists for energy neutral wastewater treatment. This advantage, along with the ability to produce a high-quality effluent amenable for reuse, have attracted the interest of the Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) to fund a pilot-scale demonstration project in Ft. Riley, Kansas. Through the startup phase and continuous demonstration period, the pilot scale AnMBR achieved effluent 5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5) close to 10 mg/L, approaching ANSI reuse standards, while Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) values were consistently below 60 mg/L, under ambient temperature conditions between 13C and 30C. Membrane performance was also consistent with permeate turbidity under 2 NTU and total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations in the membrane permeate at or below detection limit. These goals were met through continuous AnMBR optimization with Hydraulic Retention Times (HRT) of as low as 7 hours and fluxes above 6 LMH. Additionally, membrane fouling has been successfully managed with minimal cleaning events. Nutrient recovery through ion exchange and chemical coagulation has also been shown to be feasible, removing nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations by 99% and 90% respectively. This successful pilot operation demonstrates the competitiveness of AnMBRs with aerobic technologies and its viability for full scale implementation.

Kahao Lim, EIT

Student
Kansas State University

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394357 - Performance of a Pilot-Scale Gas Sparged Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor: A Case Study



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