Hydraulics & Waterways

Oral

393993 - Hydrodynamic change following living shoreline restoration based on a Before-After-Control-Impact experiment

Thursday, June 7
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Location: Regency Room
Co-Authors: Kelly Kibler, Orlando,FL – University Of Central Florida; Vasileios Kitsikoudis, Orlando,Fl – University of Central Florida

Preventing shoreline erosion is critically important as coastal hazards intensify. Living shoreline stabilization protects vulnerable coastal assets while promoting biodiversity. However, increased understanding of impacts to physical processes could improve restoration designs. This Before-After-Control-Impact study quantifies hydrodynamic change resulting from restoring a degraded estuarine shoreline using living shoreline techniques. The eroding shoreline, located in Florida’s Mosquito Lagoon, was restored using oyster shell bags and emergent vegetation. Hydrodynamic data were collected from three shoreline sites (the restored shoreline, a control degraded shoreline, and a control reference shoreline stabilized by mature mangroves) before and after living shoreline implementation. Offshore flows were characterized 10 m from the shoreline utilizing a Nortek Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) operating at 2 Hz. Onshore near-bed velocity profiles were obtained using a Nortek Vectrino Profiler sampling at 100 Hz. Derived mean and turbulent statistics were applied to characterize change in offshore-onshore hydrodynamic gradients to determine the impacts of restoration. Sediment cores were collected offshore and onshore to depths of 20 cm. Cores were processed for loss on ignition prior to combining the samples for sieve analysis. We find immediate and pronounced hydrodynamic effects, mainly attributed to the oyster shell bags. Incoming velocities were significantly attenuated in the restored site relative to before restoration while the control shoreline gradients remained static. Notably, onshore-offshore gradients of shear stress and turbulence structure within the restored site differed from the reference shoreline. Additionally, reference sediments were finer with more organic matter compared to samples from the restored and control sites.

David Spiering

University Of Central Florida

Presentation(s):

Send Email for David Spiering


Assets

393993 - Hydrodynamic change following living shoreline restoration based on a Before-After-Control-Impact experiment



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for Hydrodynamic change following living shoreline restoration based on a Before-After-Control-Impact experiment