Sustainability

Oral

393675 - Water Resource Stress of U.S. Cities: A Food-Energy-Water Nexus Study

Tuesday, June 5
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Location: Northstar B
Co-Authors: Christopher Chini, Urbana IL 61801 – University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Ashlynn Stillwell, Urbana IL 61801 – University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Landon Marston, Manhattan, KS 66506 – Kansas State University; Megan Konar, Urbana IL, 61801 – University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Increases in urbanization and population growth drive expanding demands for commodities such as food, energy, and water in cities. In addition, significant water resources are required for the production of both food and energy. Although much of the eastern United States relies on rainfed irrigation, most western states depend on blue water resources for food production. In addition, thermoelectric power plants are heavily reliant on cooling water to generate electricity. With growing literature in urban water footprinting, there is a need to determine the stress of these water footprints to more efficiently manage national water resources. Policies concerning food, energy, and water supply to cities are usually fragmented and do not account for the water scarcity of the transboundary supply nodes that produce such commodities. This work seeks to spatially quantify the direct and indirect water stress of 70 metropolitan statistical areas within the contiguous United States. While the direct water stress represents a city's lack of access to drinking water, the indirect water stress represents the scarcity of water at production locations of food, fuel, and electricity that are then transferred to the city. The main commodities and supply nodes driving water stress of cities are exposed, and opportunities to more efficiently allocate water resources are quantified. Through the visualization of a hydro-economic model, this study seeks to inform food, energy, and water policy at a national level, and construct a framework for building efficient and sustainable resource flow portfolios at a local commodity production level.

Lucas Djehdian


University of Illinois

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Lucas Djehdian


Assets

393675 - Water Resource Stress of U.S. Cities: A Food-Energy-Water Nexus Study



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for Water Resource Stress of U.S. Cities: A Food-Energy-Water Nexus Study