Emerging and Innovative Technologies

Oral

384202 - Enhancing Reliability and Resiliency of a Water Supply System Using Direct Potable Reuse through the Aquifer Storage and Recovery

Monday, June 4
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Location: Lakeshore C

Water reuse has been identified as an important component of the future water supply to support population growth and continued economic development. Planned water reuse has been practiced since the late 1800s. While initial uses were primarily for irrigation of agriculture, today reclaimed water is used for a wide range of beneficial purposes, including power plant cooling water, commercial and municipal irrigation, river and stream flow enhancement, natural gas exploration activities, and indirect potable reuse via augmentation of groundwater and/or surface supplies.
Potable reuse in not new, it has been practiced for decades. It occurs in various ways throughout the world. De-facto potable reuse, occurs daily in rivers and other water bodies everywhere through the return of reclaimed water to rivers, streams, and lakes. Planned potable reuse involves some type of advanced treatment that purifies recycled water. No matter what reuse option is selected, potable reuse provides a safe, sustainable, local water supply for many communities through the world. Potable reuse extends limited fresh-water supplies and delays, reduces or negates the need to develop more costly water supply alternatives.
In this paper, reclaimed water is considered an important alternative for water resources management through use of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) to enhance potable reuse. To assess the achieved reliability and resiliency due to as ASR system, an example is considered in which a conventional direct potable reuse system is compared with an ASR direct potable reuse system. In addition to determining the reliability, resiliency of both systems life-cycle costs is also compared for easy decision making. The study approach is based on defining resilience as the ability of a system to absorb pressure without going into failure state as well as its ability to achieve an acceptable level of function quickly after failure. A step-by-step approach to estimate resiliency of a conventional storage and an ASR system is presented. This approach can also be used to predict future challenges faced by water supply systems under the consequence of climate change.

Aditya Tyagi


Ch2m Hill

Aditya is a Principal Water Resources Technologist specializing in applications of various analytical, numerical, statistical, and optimization techniques to solve real-life problems related to multi-discipline engineering systems. He has been recognized as one of America’s leading young engineers in 2006 by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) for his pioneering technical work and leading-edge research. He has 22 years of experience working on many challenging projects related to water resources, sustainability, energy, capital infrastructure programs, and web based software development. He has published many peer reviewed journal articles, presented more than 100 technical papers at internationally prestigious conferences, authored several book chapters, and co-authored a textbook on Risk and Reliability Analysis in Civil and Environmental Engineering published by American Society of Civil Engineers.

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