Small Animal Internal Medicine

Research Abstract

HM04 - Evaluation of Two Apheresis Techniques for Plateletpheresis in the Dog

Friday, June 15
8:45 AM - 9:00 AM
Location: WSCC 307/308

Apheresis collections have become much more common in the last five years within the veterinary community. Evaluation of two standard human apheresis devices for collection of canine platelet concentrate was performed.  It was hypothesized that platelet concentrate quality would not be influenced by apheresis collection technique in the dog.


Three canine donors were chosen from a volunteer blood donor population in Washington state.  Three canine donors were chosen from a purpose bred blood donor population in New York state.  All donors had been previously screened by PCR and IFA for infectious disease as defined by the ACVIM consensus statement.  Donors demonstrated a normal CBC at the time of donation.  Only donors with platelet counts in excess of 200,000/ul were selected.  Apheresis was performed utilizing the Terumo BCT Trima device or the Haemonetics MCS plus device utilizing standard “human” protocols provided by the manufacturer.  Briefly, the Trima device and protocol utilizes a continuous separation technique for the collection of leukoreduced platelet concentrates.  The Haemonetics device utilizes a discontinuous separation technique for the collection of leukoreduced platelet concentrates.  Variances between protocols included the use of supplemental intravenous calcium gluconate with the Trima protocol and supplemental intravenous saline with the Haemonetics protocol.  Donor groups were provided with sedation and/or anesthesia appropriate for donor comfort.  Approximately 1.0 x 1011 platelets/100ml of concentrate were collected.  Residual plasma and all red blood cells were returned to the donor.  No serious adverse reactions in the donors were noted during or immediately after the event.  Platelet concentrates were shipped via independent courier in a novel platelet shipper to the laboratory in Maryland.  Platelet concentrates were evaluated by automated coulter counter on site prior to shipment, after arrival and after pooling.  pH and lactate were measured via IStat handheld analyzer.  If pH was less than 6.5, then pH was measured by standard pH meter.  All units were evaluated for “swirl” and evidence of visual clumping.  Platelet size distribution was evaluated by Flow cytometry.


Both apheresis protocols were managed without adverse reaction to the donors.  Immediate post apheresis counts confirmed a consistent harvest of 1.0 x 1011+/- 1.2 x 106 by both devices.  Red blood cell contamination was less than 0.6 x 106/ul.  White blood cell counts were less than 6.0 x 102.  Platelets prepared by the Haemonetics technique had a decrease in pH and increase in lactate when compared to platelets prepared by the Terumo technique.  However, this difference was not statistically significant.  Flow cytometric evaluation suggested a higher population of platelets in the 2.53- 5.0 micron size range in the concentrates prepared by the Haemonetics technique.  There was no significant difference between techniques using standard methodology for evaluation.  Both techniques provided platelet concentrates that met acceptance criteria for standard apheresis units.

Anne S. Hale, DVM

Chief Technical Officer
BodeVet, Inc

2017-current Chief Technical Officer, BodeVet, Inc., Rockville MD
2016-2017 Chief Technical Officer, AB Veterinary Biosciences, LLC Rockville, MD
2013-2016 Veterinarian: Practice Limited to Internal Medicine Veterinary Emergency and Specialty Center of NM
Albuquerque, NM 87109
2012-2013 Veterinarian: Critical Care and Emergency Medicine Ann Arbor Animal Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI
2010-current Chief Science Officer: The Platelet Farm, LLC, Placitas NM
2010-2012 Director: Advanced Veterinary Transfusion Solutions, PLLC, Stockbridge, MI
2008-2010 CEO: Animal Blood Resources International, Stockbridge MI/Dixon, CA
1995- 2008 Director and Owner: Midwest Animal Blood Services, Inc. Stockbridge, MI
1993- 1999 Veterinarian: Limited to Internal Medicine and Oncology Ann Arbor Animal Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI

1993- 1995 Research Associate NIH Fellow: Transfusion Medicine Academic Award: Dr. R. W. Bull MSU Immunohematology and Serology Laboratory, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI
1990- 1993 Resident: Small Animal Internal Medicine Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI
1989- 1990 Veterinarian: General Companion Animal Practice, Animal Medical Clinic of Camden County, St Marys, GA
1988-1989 Intern: Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University,
E Lansing, MI

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