Category: Health and Health Care

8 - Feasibility and Efficacy of Eccentric Strengthening Exercise for Veterans with Knee Arthritis

Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic condition that affects articular cartilage and skeletal muscle. Eccentric exercise has been proposed as an innovative approach to strengthening appropriate for older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine if eccentric exercise was feasible and beneficial for Veterans with knee OA. Male Veterans with knee OA (n=36; age=62.2±5.7 yr; BMI=31.2±6.5) participated in the study. Self-reported symptoms and physical function were evaluated using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Knee OA asymmetry was determined by the Kellgren–Lawrence grade and self-reported pain. Stepping kinetics were assessed using the Neurocom force plate. B-mode quantitative US with a 13-6 MHz linear array transducer was used to obtain muscle thickness values. The primary scanning site was the rectus femoris. Exercise group participants engaged in supervised progressive eccentric strengthening twice per week for 12 weeks using an isokinetic dynamometer, and active control participants completed a home stretching program. While the KOOS scores remained unchanged in both groups (p > .05), the exercise group participants exhibited increased muscle strength and muscle hypertrophy (p < .05). In addition, stepping kinetics were improved in the exercise group in comparison to the active control participants (p < .05).  Overall, the more involved limb exhibited a greater adaptive response to the intervention in comparison to the less involved limb. In summary, eccentric exercise was safe to employ given the stable self-reported KOOS scores involving pain and function. Eccentric exercise positively affected muscle performance and stepping kinematics without exacerbating knee OA symptoms.


 

Michael Harris-Love

Laboratory Director
Washington DC VA Medical Center
Washington, District of Columbia

Dr. Michael Harris-Love currently serves the DC VAMC as a principal investigator and deputy director of a post-doctoral fellowship program. In addition, he directs the Muscle Morphology, Mechanics, and Performance Laboratory (3MAP Lab) within the DC VAMC Clinical Research Center. His academic appointment is at George Washington University. He is an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences of the Milken Institute School of Public Health.

Max Toch

Research Service Volunteer
Washington DC VA Medical Center
Washington, District of Columbia

Mr. Max Toch currently serves the DC VAMC as a Research Volunteer at the Muscle Morphology, Mechanics, and Performance Laboratory (3MAP Lab) within the DC VAMC Clinical Research Center. He is also a former participant in the eccentric exercise study for Veterans with knee osteoarthritis.

Brian Hoover

Clinical Research Coordinator
Washington DC VA Medical Center
Washington, District of Columbia

Mr. Brian Hoover serves the DC VAMC Muscle Morphology, Mechanics, and Performance Laboratory (3MAP Lab) as a Clinical Research Coordinator.

Haniel Hernandez

Clinical Research Associate
Washington DC VA Medical Center
Washington, District of Columbia

Dr. Haniel Hernandez serves the DC VAMC Muscle Morphology, Mechanics, and Performance Laboratory (3MAP Lab) as a Clinical Research Associate. Dr. Hernandez helped to conduct the eccentric exercise study for Veterans with knee osteoarthritis as an Interprofessional Polytrauma and Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation Advanced Fellow through the VA Office of Academic Affairs.