China and Inner Asia

Roundtable Session

(78) China and the World in 1900: Comparative Perspectives

3/23/2018
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Location: Roosevelt Room 4, Exhibit Level

1900 was a dramatic year for China, due to such events as the the fifty-five day siege of Beijing laid by anti-Christian militants known as “Boxers” and Qing Dynasty troops, and the international invasion by an Allied Army with soldiers from eight countries.  This panel will ask how new light can be shed on these actions by paying attention to comparisons, some of which move across space, others across time.  In 1900, many participants and observers thought of Chinese events as related to or entwined with conflicts underway in other places (e.g., the Tagalog Rebellion), and there was much talk as well about echoes of the past (e.g., Britons often likened the siege of Beijing to one that took place during the 1857 Mutiny).  After 1900, moreover, analogies have been drawn between the Boxers and other groups, including the Red Guards.  Each participant in this panel will bring up comparisons that move between countries, periods, or both.  The format will be innovative in that the panel will be divided into three parts.  In the first, geographical comparisons will be central.  Xu will give a short presentation that moves between China and the United States and Sebring will give one on contrasting visual works produced in Asia and the West in 1900.  After their presentations—both no more than ten minutes—there will be twenty minutes for discussion among all panelists and give and take with the audience. The second third will concentrate on chronological comparisons, with Wasserstrom exploring ways that the Chinese crisis could generate a sense of déjà vu, while Bickers looks at later events that can be seen as replays of sorts of things that happened in 1900.  Again, the presentations will be short, the time for discussion extended.  The final third will have no presentations just discussion.  To start it, though, Meyer-Fong, a specialist in earlier periods, and Mitter, who has worked most on World War II, will give short comments that reflect on the comparisons raised up to that point and perhaps suggest further ones.

Jeffrey Wasserstrom

Journal of Asian Studies, California

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Jeffrey Wasserstrom

Rana Mitter

University of Oxford, England, United Kingdom

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Rana Mitter

Jeffrey Wasserstrom

Journal of Asian Studies, California

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Jeffrey Wasserstrom

Robert Bickers

University of Bristol, England, United Kingdom

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Robert Bickers

Tobie Meyer-Fong

Johns Hopkins University, Maryland

Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Tobie Meyer-Fong

    Xiangyu Xu

    Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania

    Presentation(s):

      Send Email for Xiangyu Xu

      Ellen Sebring

      Duke University, North Carolina

      Presentation(s):

        Send Email for Ellen Sebring


        Assets

        China and the World in 1900: Comparative Perspectives



        Attendees who have favorited this

        Please enter your access key

        The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

        Send Email for China and the World in 1900: Comparative Perspectives