Japan

Organized Panel Session

4 - Bo(a)rders of the Imperial Japanese Screen: Amateur Film, Tourism PR, and the "Japan-Korea-Manchuria Route"

Friday, March 23
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Location: Park Tower 8222, Lobby Level

Considerations of geopolitics, border anxiety, and the drastic expansion and contraction of Japan’s sovereign territory in the last century occupy an awkward position of a “bo(a)rder”: a constitutive other of a discipline, in this case, Anglophone study of Japanese cinema (Cheetham 1998). This tendency has been challenged by scholarship on imperial-era cinema that has recognized the impact of geopolitics on cinema, as evidenced by the mise-en-scène of hybridity in 1930s melodrama (Misonou 2012), cross-ethnic romance in Korea-Japanese co-productions (Fujitani 2011), and competing models of “Pan-Asian” spectatorship (Fujiki 2015). These studies urge us to see cinema as a contested site torn between the exclusionary dynamics of Fascism and the inclusive dynamics of total mobilization underwritten by Pan-Asianism. My study extends the inquiry of the geopolitical impact on cinema to the period following the dissolution of the empire in 1945. My objects of analysis are Kaneto Shindo’s Shinuhodo aitai (1961), Kirio Urayama’s Foundry Town (1962), and Tadashi Imai’s This Is the Port Light (1962), namely three melodramas that feature Korean characters as liminal characters that mark the symbolic border represented by the Sea of Japan. Although these works have been discussed in the context of minority representation, this study reframes them in the transnational inquiry into the intersection of the critical geopolitical shift from the imperial to the post-imperial world order (MacCabe and Grieveson 2001). As such this study contributes to the ongoing debates at the intersection of Japanese Studies and Film Studies to open up Japanese film history to comparative inquiries. 

Shota T. Ogawa

Nagoya University, Aichi, Japan

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4 - Bo(a)rders of the Imperial Japanese Screen: Amateur Film, Tourism PR, and the "Japan-Korea-Manchuria Route"



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Send Email for Bo(a)rders of the Imperial Japanese Screen: Amateur Film, Tourism PR, and the "Japan-Korea-Manchuria Route"