China and Inner Asia

Organized Panel Session

Cartographic Practices in Qing China

Saturday, July 7
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Mahogany, First Floor

This panel aims to bring together four papers that focus on cartographic practice in Qing China (1636-1911). It intends to show the diversity of these practices by studying Qing-produced cartographies that reflect political and commercial connections, both within the empire and to the outside world. It does so by focusing on four distinct regions that were of interest to Qing cartographers: Elke Papelitzky’s paper will focus on Qing cartography of the Philippines, which developed into an important trading post for Chinese merchants; Gu Songjie’s paper will discuss the geography of the Northeast of the Empire, where its imperial-dynastic roots lay; Mario Cams will address issues relating to Central Asia, the focus of Qing expansion during the mid-18th century; and Wang Yao will examine a map of the East Coast, where China’s commercial heartland was located. As such, this panel covers much of Asia from the perspective of Qing China’s mapmakers, all of whom lived and worked in one of the largest land empires in world history and one that provided a prevalent imperial alternative to the Greco-Roman idea of the Asian continent as an organizing principle in geography.   

Mario Cams

University of Macau, Macau

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Mario Cams

University of Macau, Macau

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Elke Papelitzky

Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany

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Songjie Gu

Minzu University of China, China (People's Republic)

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Mario Cams

University of Macau, Macau

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