South Asia

Organized Panel Session

4 - Comics Dissonance: Queering the Anthology in India

Saturday, July 7
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Silveroak I, Ground Floor

In India, the United States, and elsewhere, the comics anthology is on the forefront of innovation within the medium. Alongside crowd-funding, Patreon, and the rapid growth of indie comics expos, these collections of various creators’ work are playing an essential role in establishing creator credibility while expanding their audiences. In the context of India’s comics world, the anthology arguably has a long-running role, from small press publications to the mass mediations of Tinkle and Comics Jump. In its current form, though, the comics anthology in India offers a means to catalyze conversations about representation and broader social issues – especially when it comes to queer creators and their storytelling. This paper looks at the work behind comics anthologies, with a focus on Drawing the Line: Indian Women Fight Back, edited by Priya Kuriyan, Larrisa Bertonasco, and Ludmilla Bartscht, and Eat the Sky, Drink the Ocean, edited by Kirsty Murray, Payal Dhar, and Anita Roy. In particular, I will focus on how queer creators rework both the comics form and their communities through the editing and production of such works. Along the way, I will be grounded in my own experiences as a contributor to comics anthologies and as a co-editor alongside Vidyun Sabhaney on DOGS! An Anthology of Comics about Our Canine Companions, Fundamentally, I will argue that anthologies provide a means to shape larger comics worlds and the cultures that contain them by curating inclusive representation and the creative work of comics.

Jeremy Stoll

Columbus College of Art & Design, United States

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