Research in Action

The Possible Long-Term Catastrophic Consequences of a Short-Term Intubation: A Survey of 314 Patients Diagnosed as Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis (.5 Class A CE)

Saturday, September 22
11:45 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Room 311, Hynes

A self-knowledge assessment of routine airway management and knowledge level followed by pathophysiology of SGS and the scientific research of tracheal ischemia that supports cuff pressure monitoring. The leading theories of ISS will be dissected and alternative theories offered.

Learning Objectives:

Patricia A. Weott, DNAP, CRNA

Senior Nurse Anesthetist
University of California, San Francisco Medical Center
Corte Madera, California

I have been in healthcare since 1979, a CRNA since 1999 and completed the DNAP in 2013. After a well-known airway surgeon challenged my routine endotradcheal tube practices, I began my research on intubation-related problems, including the catastrophic complication of subglottic stenosis (SGS). I then began investigating patients labeled as Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis (ISS) and discovered the probable link between a past intubation and the later diagnosis of ISS. I am a passionate advocate of using evidenced-based medicine to prevent harm through new standards of care in anesthesia: 1.) Check cuff pressure with a cuff manometer with each and every intubation and 2.) Use the appropriate size endotracheal tube for the size of the patients tracheal diameter.

Presentation(s):

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The Possible Long-Term Catastrophic Consequences of a Short-Term Intubation: A Survey of 314 Patients Diagnosed as Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis (.5 Class A CE)

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