Poster Presentation

Poster Presentation

PR86 - Novel Strategy for Dental Pulp Regeneration Promotes Cell Migration

Thursday, April 26
10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Room: Exhibit Hall

Objective: Root canal therapy (RCT) replaces dental pulp tissue with an inert filler, rendering the tooth mechanically functional but non-vital. Acellular regenerative therapies require recruitment of cells and neurovascular tissue into the tooth canals. We have developed a chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model to evaluate regenerative therapies and develop a potential acellular scaffold therapy that recruits vasculature and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs). Methods: Gelatin sponges were fabricated and mechanical properties were evaluated in unconfined compression. To simulate RCT, sponges were inserted into silicone rings and sealed with mineral trioxide aggregate on the top side. These were placed on seven-day-old chick CAMs (vasculature source). A full factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of a chemotactic agent (±C) and PDLSCs (±P) on cell and vascular infiltration. A human PDLSC pellet was placed between the constructs and CAM for +P groups. Sponges were doped with medium with or without C. After seven days, constructs were harvested and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Results: Gelatin sponges contained interconnected pores (~300 μm width). The sponges had a dynamic compressive modulus of 29±3 kPa. The scaffolds supported cell adhesion and angiogenesis near the CAM. Conclusions: While good for screening angiogenic effects, the CAM is limited in studying PDLSC migration by CAM fibroblast invasion. Species-specific staining and longer time-points will be used to chemotactic effects on PDLSC migration. These scaffolds can promote cellular infiltration, and have sufficient mechanical properties to replace conventional fillers. Subsequent work will investigate vital pulp-like tissue formation in vivo

Patrick E. Donnelly

Dental Student
University of Pittsburgh

Patrick received a BS in chemistry from the University of Scranton and a PhD in chemistry from Princeton University. Patrick completed an NIH T32 postdoctoral fellowship at the Hospital for Special Surgery. He is now a DMD student at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine.

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Jingming Chen

Graduate Student

Jingming Chen is a 6th year graduate student in the laboratory of Dr. Juan Taboas studying for a PhD in Bio-Engineering. She studies how biomaterials can modulate the cellular-molecular environment.

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Tyler Swenson

Research Technician
University of Pittsburgh

Tyler is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh and has been working in the laboratory of Dr. Juan Taboas for 6 months. Her research involves the study of drug delivery systems and she aspires to become a dentist.

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Robert Hasselbach

Endodontics Resident
University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Hasselbach is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine. After graduation Dr. Hasselbach completed an AEGD at the University of Pittsburgh and is now a 1st year endodontic resident.

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Herbert Ray

Chair, Department of Endodontics
University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Ray is the Chair of the Department of Endodontics and Program Director of the Graduate Endodontics Program at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine.

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Juan Taboas

Assistant Professor
University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Taboas is an Assistant Professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine in the department of Oral Biology in the Center for Craniofacial Regeneration.

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