Poster Presentation

Poster Presentation

PR101 - Growth Conditions and Delivery System for the Clinical Use of DPSCs for Cell Therapy

Thursday, April 26
10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Room: Exhibit Hall

One of the central goals of root canal therapy is to remove diseased dental pulp tissue so that it can be replaced with restorative and endodontic materials. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) offer the potential to regenerate the dental pulp, however, traditional methods of cultivating these cells uses animal derived serum (fetal bovine serum, horse serum). These animal-derived components are prohibitive for DPSCs to be used in humans and as such, safer and clinically acceptable methodologies for DPSC are needed. In this study, human DPSCs were isolated from extracted third molars and cultured in either: 1) standard culture media containing animal serum, 2) media containing human serum, or 3) media containing human platelet lysate (Stemulate®). DPSC growth and multi-potent differentiation was compared between these different cultivation conditions and following cell expansion, DPSCs were incorporated into an injectable, synthetic peptide hydrogel (PuraMatrix®). Analysis of DPSC proliferative capacity showed that there was no difference in growth between the different conditions, with population doubling times being consistently 2.5 days. The multipotency of DPSCs also remained equivalent, regardless of the three different media conditions in which they were cultured. Finally, DPSCs cultured in media devoid of animal serum demonstrated the capacity for incorporation and growth in Puramatrix and remained viable in the hydrogel for up to two weeks, which has important implications for their potential clinical use for dental pulp tissue regeneration. The results ofthese studies are significant translational steps toward development of protocols using DPSCs for clinical cell therapies.

Darnell Kaigler

Principal Investigator
University of Michigan School of Dentistry

Completed his DDS in 2001 and in 2004, earned a PhD in Oral Health Sciences (David Mooney, advisor). Dr. Kaigler subsequently earned a certificate in Operative Dentistry, followed by an MS in Clinical Research Design and Statistical Analysis and a Post-doctoral Fellowship through the School's NIDCR Tissue Engineering Training Program at the Clinical Research Core (formerly known as MCOHR). Dr. Kaigler's research focuses on cell-based therapies for alveolar bone tissue engineering applications.

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Kelsie J. Pittel

Dental Student Researcher
University of Michigan School of Dentistry

Kelsie earned a bachelor of science in biology at the University of Michigan before beginning dental school at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. She is expected to graduate in May of 2019 and aspires to earn an M.S. in endodontics in the future.

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Susan A. Tarle

Sr. Research Specialist
University of Michigan School of Dentistry

Sue has 30 years of laboratory management specializing in tissue culture of primary cells and stem cells. She has an impressive record of quality publications and oversees the maintenance of impeccable company records, the highest quality control and reproducibility of processes.

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Malika Malik

Dental Student Researcher

Malika graduated with a B.S. from the University of Michigan in 2016, and now is a first year dental student at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry.

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Elizabeth Hatfield

Dental Student Researcher
University of Michigan School of Dentistry

Liz Hatfield graduated from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry in 2017 and is a current resident in the General Practice Residency at the University of Michigan Hospital.

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