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Evidence-Supported Curriculum for Low-Income and Gifted Learners: Why Reinvent the Wheel?

Friday, November 10
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Location: 207 D

Educators face competing priorities and are constantly pressed for time, especially when working in Title 1 schools. So why focus needed energy on creating materials when evidence-supported curriculum has already been designed and found effective with low-income gifted and high-achieving learners? In this panel session, hear from current and past Javits grant researchers and practitioners as they share their insights, effectiveness data, and lessons learned when developing and implementing curricula that supports low-income gifted learners. Discover patterns that all curricula effective with this population share, and walk away with a list of curricula descriptions and subsequent achievement data.

Send Email for Ann Robinson

Tamra Stambaugh

Associate Research Professor; Executive Director, Programs for Talented Youth
Vanderbilt University

Tamra Stambaugh, Ph.D., is an associate research professor in special education and executive director of Programs for Talented Youth at Vanderbilt University. Stambaugh conducts research in gifted education with a focus on students living in rural settings, students of poverty, and curriculum and instructional interventions that promote gifted student learning. She is the co-author/editor of several books including but not limited to: Comprehensive Curriculum for Gifted Learners (2007) (with Joyce VanTassel-Baska); Overlooked Gems: A National Perspective on Low-Income Promising Students (2007) (with Joyce VanTassel-Baska), the Jacob’s Ladder Reading Comprehension, Nonfiction, and Affective Program Series (with Joyce VanTassel-Baska), Practical Solutions for Under-represented Gifted Students: Effective Curriculum (2012) (with Kim Chandler), Serving Gifted Students in Rural Settings (Legacy Award Winner) (with Susannah Wood), and The Vanderbilt Programs for Talented Youth ELA and Integrated Curriculum units (with Emily Mofield et al.). Stambaugh has also written numerous articles and book chapters and was co-editor of the special Gifted Child Quarterly issue (January 2018) focused on students from low-income households. She provides keynotes, professional development workshops, and consultation to school districts nationally and internationally and shares her work at refereed research conferences. She also serves on multiple NAGC committees.

Stambaugh is the recipient of several awards, including the Margaret The Lady Thatcher Medallion for scholarship, service, and character from the College of William and Mary School of Education; the Doctoral Student Award, Early Leader Award, and several curriculum awards from the National Association for Gifted Children; the Jo Patterson Service Award and Curriculum Award from the Tennessee Association for Gifted Children; and the Higher Education Award from the Ohio Association for Gifted Children. Prior to her appointment at Vanderbilt she was director of grants and special projects at the College of William and Mary, Center for Gifted Education, where she earned her PhD.

Presentation(s):

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Catherine Little

Associate Professor
University of Connecticut

Catherine Little, PhD, is an Associate Professor in Educational Psychology at the University of Connecticut. She teaches courses in gifted and talented education and in the undergraduate honors program, and she serves on the University’s Honors Board of Associate Directors. Her research interests include professional development, differentiation of curriculum and instruction for advanced learners, and classroom questioning practices. She co-edited the text Content-Based Curriculum for High-Ability Learners with Joyce VanTassel-Baska. Catherine is currently serving as Governance Secretary of the Board of Directors of the National Association for Gifted Children.

Presentation(s):

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Shelagh Gallagher

Consultant
Engaged Education

Dr. Shelagh A. Gallagher works with teachers and schools around the world to promote appropriate education for gifted children. She currently runs Engaged Education, a consulting firm for gifted education in Charlotte, NC. Under that umbrella she provides professional development, participated in policy forums, writes curriculum, and recruits teachers for the Diligence and Delight Learning Center in China. Earlier in her career, Dr. Gallagher spent 15 years leading the gifted education licensure and M.Ed. programs at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte. Before that Dr. Gallagher served as Director of Research and Assessment at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy. Shelagh is best known for her work developing Problem-Based Learning curriculum for gifted students, however, she has also conducted research, made presentations, and published articles on topics related to the development and education of gifted children. Shelagh served two terms on the Board of Directors of the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) and is currently a US delegate to the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children. She has received the Distinguished Service Award and the James J. Gallagher Award for Advocacy from the North Carolina Association for Gifted and Talented, the Provost’s Award for Teaching Excellence from UNC Charlotte, and the Article of the Year Award from NAGC. Eight of Dr. Gallagher’s curriculum units have won the NAGC Curriculum Division Award for Outstanding Curriculum. She recently received the “Person of SIGnificance” award from the National Society for Gifted and Talented. Every summer Dr. Gallagher makes time to work to work with gifted adolescents as a Fellow at the IEA award-winning camp Yunasa.

Presentation(s):

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