Social and Emotional Development

Concurrent

I Should Have Studied Instead of Playing: Academic Self-Handicapping Behaviors of Middle School Gifted Students

Friday, November 10
1:15 PM - 2:15 PM
Location: 218 A

Some students purposefully display self-handicapping behaviors when they expect to perform poorly on a subsequent academic task. They then attribute their low performance to the self-handicapping behaviors, thereby avoiding a possible perception of lack of ability by their friends. Do academically gifted students also have self-handicapping tendencies? How do their academic self-efficacy and achievement goal orientations influence their self-handicapping behaviors? This session provides an overview of these questions based on a study examining self-efficacy, achievement goal orientation, and self-handicapping behaviors of 104 academically gifted middle school students.

Harun Tadik

PhD Student
University of Georgia

Harun TADIK is a doctoral student at University of Georgia, where he is pursuing a degree in Educational Psychology with concentration on Gifted and Creative Education. He completed his master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction at University of Cincinnati, USA and earned his bachelor degree in Gifted and Talented Education from Istanbul University, Turkey. He is currently a research assistant in Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development at University of Georgia. His research interest includes social-emotional needs of gifted children, assessment of creativity, divergent thinking, and environmental influences on creativity.

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I Should Have Studied Instead of Playing: Academic Self-Handicapping Behaviors of Middle School Gifted Students

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