Curriculum Studies

Concurrent

Getting More from your CogAT Scores: Instructional Differentiation Using Ability and Achievement Test Data

Friday, November 10
9:15 AM - 10:15 AM
Location: 218 A

Differentiating instruction is a critical teaching approach that can benefit all students. However, these opportunities are not always realized for gifted and talented students, for whom teachers may not realize that differentiation is necessary. Whether students with strong reasoning abilities are served in the regular classroom or in other arrangements, teachers can make adaptations suited to the range of cognitive strengths and weaknesses in their students. In this session, we use CogAT as an example of a multi-dimensional ability test that can promote instructional differentiation. Using hands-on activities, we explore score reports and develop strategies for differentiating instruction for students with different ability and achievement score profiles.

Joni M. Lakin

Associate Professor
Auburn University

Dr. Lakin received her Ph.D. in Psychological and Quantitative Foundations from The University of Iowa. She completed an AERA-ETS Postdoctoral Fellowship at Educational Testing Service. She is now an associate professor at Auburn University in the Department of Educational Foundations, Leadership, and Technology. She conducts educational measurement research related to test validity and fairness with a particular interest in the accessibility of tests for English learner students. She is also involved in program evaluation focused on STEM education, building K-12 STEM excellence, and promoting STEM retention along the academic pipeline.

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