Special Populations

Concurrent

Exploratory Study on the Identification of English Learners in Gifted and Talented Programs

Saturday, November 11
1:15 PM - 2:15 PM
Location: 207 D

English Learners are the fastest growing population of learners in the United States However, despite the growing numbers of EL students, their representation in gifted identification and programming continues to lag behind not only traditional populations of learners, but also other underserved populations of learners. The severe underrepresentation of ELs in gifted programming represents a societal and research problem that merits a thorough investigation. The first step was to investigate what practices are being successfully implemented to identify gifted EL students. Four promising identification practices were evident in three states: universal screening, alternative pathways, communication techniques, and professional development.

E. Jean Gubbins

Professor
University of Connecticut

Dr. E. Jean Gubbins is Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Connecticut. Through grant funding from the United States Department of Education for The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT), Dr. Gubbins implemented research studies focusing on the curricular strategies and practices in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) high schools, reading and mathematics education in elementary schools, professional development, and gifted education pedagogy for all students. Currently, she is the Associate Director and co-Principal Investigator for our grant funded center from the United States Department of Education entitled the National Center for Research on Gifted Education. The Center’s research focuses on exemplary practices in identification and programming for gifted and talented students as well as identification practices of gifted and talented English learners.

Dr. Gubbins has conducted over 50 program evaluations for school districts around the country and implemented literacy and arts-integrated evaluations for non-profit organizations. Her research, evaluation, and teaching interests stem from prior experiences as a classroom teacher, teacher of gifted and talented students, evaluation consultant, and professional developer. She teaches graduate courses in gifted education and talent development related to identification, programming, curriculum development, and program evaluation.

Presentation(s):

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Jeb Puryear

Research Associate
University of Connecticut

Jeb Puryear is a teaching fellow and doctoral candidate studying Educational Psychology with a concentration in Gifted and Talented education at the University of North Texas. Prior to this position, he spent thirteen years as chemistry teacher and five years as the coordinator of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program. He is an active member of NAGC, AERA, TAGT, and SERA including leadership roles. He has served as an ad hoc manuscript reviewer for journals in the field. He is a two-time winner at the NAGC R&E Graduate Student Research Gala His areas of research include creativity measurement/ theory, STEM talent development, gifted education paradigms/conceptions, and advanced academic inequity based on locale and race.

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Rashea Hamilton

Research Scientist
University of Connecticut

Rashea Hamilton is a researcher whose work focuses on issues addressing access and equity across the educational pipeline. She has over 10 years of research experience related to at-risk populations. Her primary areas of expertise include social inequality, parental engagement and quantitative methodology. Previously, she served as a researcher for the John Glenn School of Public Affairs at the Ohio State University where she worked on a state-level research initiative to enhance the quality and value of higher education. She also served as an instructor for Ohio State’s Quantitative Research, Evaluation and Methodology program and as an evaluator for Education Northwest in Portland Oregon.

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Del Siegle

Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Affairs
University of Connecticut

Del Siegle is Director of the National Center for Research on Gifted Education (NCRGE) and Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Affairs in the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut. He is a past president of the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC), past president of the Montana Association of Gifted and Talented Education (Montana AGATE), and past chair of the Research on Giftedness, Creativity, and Talent SIG of the American Educational Research Association (AERA). He was a founding co-editor of the Journal of Advanced Academics and recently finished a term as co-editor of Gifted Child Quarterly. Dr. Siegle is co-author of the 6th and 7th editions of Education of the Gifted and Talented. He is also author of The Underachieving Gifted Child: Recognizing, Understanding, & Reversing Underachievement. In 2016, he received the Palmarium Award, which is given yearly to the individual most exemplifying the vision of a future in which giftedness will be understood, embraced, and systematically nurtured throughout the nation and the world. Prior to becoming a professor, Del worked with gifted and talented students in Montana

Presentation(s):

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Rachel U. Mun

Assistant Professor
University of North Texas

Dr. Rachel U. Mun is Assistant Professor at the University of North Texas in Educational Psychology (Gifted and Talented concentration). She received her Ph.D. in Education, Learning Sciences and Human Development from the University of Washington. Dr. Mun’s research interests are best described as an intersection between gifted education, mental health and immigrant issues. Her research focuses on culturally responsive leadership, social and emotional development, parental influences, decision-making and educational access for special populations of gifted learners using primarily mixed and qualitative methods. Most recently, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Center for Research on Gifted Education (NCRGE) at the University of Connecticut, conducting research on identifying and serving traditionally underrepresented gifted learners.

Presentation(s):

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Ashley Y. Carpenter

Graduate Research Assistant
University of Connecticut

Ashley Carpenter is a doctoral candidate at the University of Connecticut. She is the mother of a twice-exceptional child and taught middle school science for 15 years. She has experience with Exceptional Student Education (ESE), drop–out prevention, and full-time gifted programs. She taught at the Center for Gifted Studies in Pinellas County, Florida for 6 years. She has her Bachelor’s of Science degree in Marine Science from Eckerd College, her Master’s of Arts degree in Science Education from the University of South Florida, and is completing her Doctorate in Educational Psychology in the Creativity, Gifted Education, and Talent Development department under Dr. Del Siegle. Her interests include underachievement of gifted adolescents and twice-exceptional students.

Presentation(s):

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Pamela Peters

Graduate Research Assistant
University of Connecticut

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Emma Bloomfield

Research Assistant
University of Connecticut

Presentation(s):

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