Category: Poster

8 - Academic Coachability: The Role of Receptivity in Developing Academic Talent

Saturday, Nov 11
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Considered fundamental to talent development in athletics and fine arts, the construct of coachability has received little attention in the academic domain. Yet a student’s attitude toward criticism and ability to incorporate feedback are crucial for eminent academic achievement. This session draws on research from the performance domains to formulate an understanding of academic coachability and its relevance to gifted identification and programming. Framing our discussion within a talent development paradigm, we identify personal and environmental factors that contribute to academic coachability and present strategies for encouraging coachable behavior at various points along the academic talent developmental trajectory.

Sam Earls

Doctoral Student
University of North Texas
Denton, Texas

Samuel Earls is a doctoral student in Educational Psychology at the University of North Texas and an Academic Counselor at the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science. He previously served as a Residential Counselor at the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky, where he fell in love with early entrance programs and committed to pursuing a career in gifted and talented education.

Luke Hurst

Doctoral Student
University of North Texas
Denton, Texas

I began my educational career teaching high school, Pre-AP English. After enjoying eight years in the ELA classroom, I moved into the counseling office for the last two years as I worked toward my PhD from the University of North Texas in the field of Gifted Education. My current focuses include talent development in the ELA classroom, the qualities that separate a good teacher from an inspirational teacher, and the advancement of minority populations in gifted programming.

Kristen N. Lamb

Doctoral Candidate
University of North Texas
Denton, Texas

Kristen Lamb is a doctoral candidate and teaching fellow in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of North Texas with a concentration in Gifted and Talented Education. She teaches courses in research methods, gifted education, and lifespan development. She currently serves as the Graduate Student Representative for the AERA Research on Giftedness, Creativity, and Talent Development SIG. Previously, she was a science teacher in Fort Worth, Texas. Her research investigates the nature of creativity in domain specific contexts and the role of creativity in talent development.

Anne N. Rinn

Associate Professor
University of North Texas
Denton, Texas

Dr. Anne N. Rinn is an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology and Director of the Office for Giftedness, Talent Development, and Creativity at the University of North Texas. She received her undergraduate degree in Psychology from the University of Houston and her doctorate in Educational Psychology from Indiana University. Her expertise is in the area of the social and emotional development of gifted individuals.

Kendal N. Smith

Doctoral Student
University of North Texas
Denton, Texas

Kendal N. Smith is a doctoral student and teaching fellow in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of North Texas. She holds a law degree from George Mason University and previously worked in homeland security education. Her research focuses on intellectual and moral virtue development in high-ability individuals.