Category: Poster

27 - Extreme Makeover: Amping Up Literacy Practices for Advanced Readers in Primary Grades

Friday, Nov 10
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Today’s teachers must adhere to a number of accountability requirements at the local, state, and national levels. As a result, early childhood educators tend to focus more on struggling readers than advanced readers. Grounded in two years of investigation in kindergarten classrooms focused on literacy, this session focuses on how general education and gifted resource teachers can address the academic needs of advanced primary learners, given that the focus is often placed on those with learning deficits. Participants use our classroom analysis tool to transform three primary classroom scenarios in need of an “extreme makeover.” We focus on differentiated classroom centers and resources to implement best literacy practices for advanced readers.

Catherine Brighton

Associate Dean for Academic Programs and Student Affairs
UVA
Charlottesville, Virginia

Catherine Brighton is the Associate Dean for Academic Programs and Student Affairs and is an Associate Professor in the graduate program Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning at the University of Virginia, Curry School of Education. Additionally, Dr. Brighton serves as the Director of the Institutes on Academic Diversity. She earned her doctorate in Educational Psychology - Gifted Education at the University of Virginia in 2001. Prior, she was a curriculum coordinator/assistant principal, teacher of the gifted, and classroom teacher in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, (Charlotte, NC). She was recognized by the National Association for Gifted Children in 2005 as the Early Leader for the Association. This award is given annually to an individual who has exhibited the highest and most consistent degree of leadership in the field of gifted education since receiving the doctorate. Her current research interests include investigations surrounding high quality teaching and learning (authentic problem solving, differentiated instruction, critical and creative thinking, and teacher content knowledge) and qualitative methodologies.

Vicki Hobson

Doctoral Student
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, Virginia

Vicki Hobson is an Ed.D. student at the University of Virginia's Curry School of Education in the Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education department. She was an elementary school teacher and instructional coach prior to pursuing her doctoral degree. Vicki hopes to work closely with public schools to address opportunity gap issues once she finishes her degree.

Helen Michelle Kreamer

Doctoral Student
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, Virginia

Helen "Michelle" Kreamer is an Ed.D. student at the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education in the department of Curriculum and Instruction. Prior to pursuing her Ed.D., she was a high school English teacher in Lafayette, Louisiana. She obtained her M.Ed. in gifted education from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and has had experience working with a summer enrichment program for gifted students at the university. Michelle's research interests include pre-service teacher education and writing instruction.

Kerrigan Mahoney

Post Doc
UVA
Charlottesville, Virginia

Kerrigan Mahoney, Ph.D., is a post-doctoral research associate at the University of Virginia Curry School of Education. She earned her Ph.D. in curriculum and educational technology from The College of William and Mary. Formerly a high school English teacher, she earned a B.A. from Hamilton College and a M.S. in Secondary English Education from the University of Bridgeport, CT. Kerrigan's current research interests include literacy, qualitative research methods, teacher education, and educational technology.

Tonya Moon

University Professor
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, Virginia

Tonya R. Moon is a Professor in the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia and a co-director of the Institutes on Academic Diversity. Tonya spends her professional career actively engaged in teaching assessment, research, and statistics courses at the University and conducting research in K-12 classrooms investigating teachers’ use of data for designing instructional actions. Tonya has published and presented widely on the topics of
assessment, differentiation, identification of gifted students, and program evaluation. She is a co-author with Carol Tomlinson on the ASCD text, Assessment and Student Success in the Differentiated Classroom, and the author of a chapter on differentiation and assessment within a diverse classroom setting in the recently released Handbook of Human and Social Factors in Assessment. She works both nationally and internationally with
educators on issues associated with assessment.