Program Session

4 - Developing Locally Relevant, Easy-to-Read HIV/AIDS Print Resources

Tuesday, May 30
3:50 PM - 4:05 PM
Room: 612

Objectives: As part of an HIV/AIDS Community Information Outreach Project funded by the National Library of Medicine, the project team at the University of Florida (UF) developed a series of locally relevant, easy-to-read print handouts on HIV/AIDS testing, including the difference between anonymous and confidential testing, the process of getting an HIV test, and information about local HIV support groups. 

Methods: Librarians at UF discovered during discussions with local community organizations that providers of free or low-cost health-related services had a high need for easy-to-read print handouts that offered information about locally available resources. During the project, the team conducted an in-depth information needs assessment with representatives from community organizations that identified several key topics upon which the team could focus their efforts. The team drafted documents on anonymous & confidential testing, the testing process, and local support groups, and an external evaluation panel reviewed them for accuracy and clarity. The team also verified information about HIV testing locations in Gainesville and Jacksonville and included the list of locations and their contact information on the back of the two testing documents.

Results: The print resources were distributed to local community organizations as hard-copies and were made freely available online.  The team plans to evaluate the impact of the resources on the ability of local community organizations to provide HIV/AIDS information to their users.   

Conclusion: During outreach efforts, librarians can better meet the information needs of their intended audiences if community partners are included in project planning from the outset.  In the case of this project, despite the availability of trustworthy HIV/AIDS resources online, community partners made it clear that for high-risk populations with limited access to the internet and a low level of literacy, easy-to-read print handouts were a simple and feasible way of sharing trustworthy HIV/AIDS information quickly and in appropriate amounts.  By including information about local HIV testing locations, the handouts provide potential contacts for users interested in seeking additional help. 

Keywords: consumer health, easy-to-read, HIV/AIDS, resource development, patient handouts



Program Session

Margaret E. Ansell

Nursing & Consumer Health Librarian
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

As Nursing and Consumer Health Liaison Librarian, Margaret Ansell has provided instruction, reference, and collection development services to the UF College of Nursing (CON) since 2014. She is currently the PI on a grant funded by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, "Promoting Health Information Access through Community Partnerships"($4,997), a project that will bring health information resources & literacy skills training to librarian, community organization, and members of the public throughout Alachua County, FL. She was an investigator on a grant project funded by the National Library of Medicine, "Partnering to Provide HIV/AIDS Information Outreach" ($50,000), in which she led the development of a HIV/AIDS resources curriculum for the general public, as well as the creation of easy-to-read, locally relevant print materials on HIV topics such as testing. She was also the PI on a 2015 grant funded by UF George A. Smathers Libraries: “Educating UF Research Participants: Consumer Health Information Services at HealthStreet” ($4,071). During this project, Margaret developed a consumer health information resources curriculum that was used to train the staff of HealthStreet (a local community health research engagement initiative) to facilitate health education, performed a needs assessment that helped determine the titles purchased for a print collection of consumer health monographs, and installed the collection at HealthStreet and made available to the public. She is now working with community organizations to integrate the HealthStreet collection and online resources into health outreach efforts. Ansell has also obtained her Consumer Health Information Specialization (Level I) from the Medical Library Association.

Presentation(s):

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Hannah F. Norton

Interim Fackler Director, Associate University Librarian
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL

Hannah F. Norton is currently serving as Interim Fackler Director of the University of Florida Health Science Center Libraries. Her ongoing role is as Reference & Liaison Librarian, serving primarily as liaison to the College of Veterinary Medicine, the Department of Medicine, and the College of Medicine Class of 2019. She holds a B.A. in Biology from Carleton College and an M.S. in Information Studies from the University of Texas at Austin.

Presentation(s):

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Ariel Pomputius

Health Sciences Liaison Librarian
Health Science Center Library
Gainesville, Florida

Ariel Pomputius is a Health Sciences Liaison Librarian at the University of Florida’s Health Science Center Library. In her work, she enjoys doing research on mobile technology and marketing in health science libraries and is currently working on bringing more wellness programming to library users. In her free time, she enjoys hiking through the forests of Central Florida, kayaking among the mangroves of the coastline, and playing board games at her local brewery.

Presentation(s):

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Michele R. Tennant

Interim Fackler Director
Health Science Center Libraries
Gainesville, Florida

Michele R. Tennant, AHIP, is the Interim Director of the Health Science Center Library (HSCL) at the University of Florida. Michele received her PhD in Biology from Wayne State University, and her MLIS from the University of California, Los Angeles. At the HSCL, Michele is also head of the Biomedical and Health Information Services (BHIS) unit, which encompasses the library's liaison, instruction, reference, and outreach activities. BHIS liaisons are deeply integrated into the curricula for UF’s health sciences colleges, as well as in coursework for PhD and undergraduate science students. They provide outreach to clinicians through rounding services and to patients in clinic, and develop for researchers services related to bioinformatics, data, and public access. Michele enjoys taking on innovative and new projects, and is always looking for ways to integrate the library and its librarians into the university community.

Presentation(s):

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Nina C. Stoyan-Rosenzweig

Senior Associate in Libraries
Health Science Center Library
Gainesville, Florida

Presentation(s):

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