Category: Quality Improvement Projects (including office- or unit-based projects)

17 - Assessing the Need for a Fracture Liaison Service for Osteoporosis in a Family Health Center

Osteoporotic fractures increase the risk of morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. National guidelines recommend that health systems adopt population health approaches for patients who fracture; however, many patients do not receive appropriate post-fracture care. An osteoporosis clinic managed by a physician and pharmacist team was established in a family medicine clinic in 2006. Because the vast majority of patients seen in this clinic are primary prevention patients, a retrospective evaluation of post-fracture care in the practice was undertaken. Seventy-five patients who experienced a fragility fracture in 2013-2014 and received care at a regional community hospital were identified. After fracture, 42% of patients received treatment with a bisphosphonate and 11% of patients received a DXA scan. The one-year post-fracture mortality rate was 23%. Although 60% of patients were seen by their primary care physician, only 8% of patients were seen in osteoporosis clinic during the first year after fracture. Despite having an established osteoporosis clinic, the quality of care for patients after osteoporotic fracture was poor. Plans are underway to incorporate a pharmacist-managed fracture liaison service into the existing osteoporosis clinic.



Jon Crissman

Doctor of Pharmacy Student (PY4)
UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy
Asheville, North Carolina

Lisa LaVallee

Residency Program Director, Family Medicine
Mountain Area Health Education Center and UNC School of Medicine
Asheville, North Carolina

Tasha Woodall

Associate Director of Pharmacotherapy
Mountain Area Health Education Center and UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy
Asheville, North Carolina

Mollie ASHE.. Scott

Regional Associate Dean
UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy
Asheville, North Carolina