Plenary

Measuring the T Cell Repertoire in Checkpoint Inhibitor-induced Cancer Regression

Friday, June 16
9:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Learning Objectives:

Drew Pardoll

Abeloff Professor of Oncology, Director, Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy
Johns Hopkins University



Drew M. Pardoll, MD, PhD
Abeloff Professor of Oncology
Director of the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy
Director, Cancer Immunology
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. Pardoll is an Abeloff Professor of Oncology, Medicine, Pathology and Molecular Biology and Genetics at the Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine. He is the Director of the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy and Co-Director of the Cancer Immunology Program at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Pardoll attended Johns Hopkins University, where he earned his M.D., Ph.D., in 1982 and completed his Medical Residency and Oncology Fellowship in 1985. He then worked for three years at the National Institutes of Health as a Medical Staff Fellow. Dr. Pardoll joined the departments of oncology and medicine in 1988. Dr. Pardoll has published over 300 papers as well as over 20 book chapters on the subject of T cell immunology and cancer vaccines. Over the past two decades, Dr. Pardoll has studied molecular aspects of dendritic cell biology and immune regulation, particularly related to mechanisms by which cancer cells evade elimination by the immune system. He is an inventor of a number of immunotherapies, including GVAX cancer vaccines and Listeria monocytogenes based cancer vaccines. His more than 300 articles cover cancer vaccines, gene therapies, cancer prevention technologies, recombinant immune modulatory agents for specific pathways that regulate immunity to cancer and infectious diseases.

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Measuring the T Cell Repertoire in Checkpoint Inhibitor-induced Cancer Regression



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