Podium Session

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PD09-04: A randomised controlled feasibility study: A multimodal supportive care intervention in men and their partners/carers affected by metastatic prostate cancer

Friday, May 12
1:30 PM - 1:40 PM
Location: BCEC: Room 161

Presentation Authors: Catherine Paterson*, Charlotte Primeau, Ghulam Nabi, Dundee, United Kingdom

Introduction: A metastatic prostate cancer diagnosis and its treatments carry significant morbidity and related unmet supportive care needs. Such unmet needs have a profound decrement on patients and their families. We aimed to deliver at multimodal intervention based approach that targeted unmet needs for men and their partner/carers and compared this to current standard care.

Methods: A two arm randomised controlled feasibility trial compared standard care to a multimodal supportive care intervention that combined an educational seminar on prostate cancer thrivership and individualized care from a designated prostate cancer specialist nurse. This involved in-depth assessment using patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) in routine clinical practice, followed up with a tailored plan of ongoing support to address informational, emotional, social and practical needs. 38 participants and 10 carers/partners completed validated and reliable self-reported measures at baseline and at 3 months. 32 Semi-structured interviews were conducted with men, carers/partners and members of the multidisciplinary team. Self-efficacy was included as the potential moderator/mediator of intervention effect. Primary outcomes are unmet supportive care needs and quality of life. An economic evaluation was conducted alongside the randomised trial.

Results: 29 participants in standard care arm (age 77.5, SD 6.2 years) identified a range of unmet supportive care needs related to physical, psychological/emotional, intimacy/sexual, practical, health system/informational, existential and patient/clinician communication needs. 19 participants (age 74.9, SD 8.2, years) in the interventions group, reported overall high satisfaction with the intervention and acceptance of PROMs in routine clinical practice, with less prevalence of unmet needs compared to standard care over time. Men and carers/partners perceived that they had derived benefit from this model of care. Certain themes clearly emerged as important for participants, including being listened to by someone who could facilitate emotional expression, being provided with individually tailored information and receiving practical help and evidence-based advice for managing the consequences of cancer and its associated treatments. Significant cost-savings emerged in favour of the intervention.

Conclusions: This study has demonstrated that a multimodality supportive care intervention for men and their carer/partners affected by metastatic prostate cancer can achieve optimal supportive care. The active components of the intervention have been distinguished and provide the basis for the development of a larger sufficiently powered trial.

Source Of Funding: The Urology Foundation

Catherine Paterson, PhD, MSc, BA, RAN

University of Dundee

Dr Catherine Paterson, PhD, MSc, BA, RAN, University of Dundee

Catherine is a registered Adult Nurse, with a BA Nursing (Distinction), MSc Nursing (Distinction) and PhD Nursing and more recently Master’s level Non-Medical Prescribing (Distinction). Currently, working as a Clinical/Academic in Prostate Cancer Care and urology research. Her research interests include eHealth, Cancer Care, Patient Experience, Supportive Care, and Urological cancers. She has significant experience in the design and conduct of multi-site clinical trials and the development and evaluation of eHealth interventions.

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PD09-04: A randomised controlled feasibility study: A multimodal supportive care intervention in men and their partners/carers affected by metastatic prostate cancer



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