Podium Session

Poster, Podium & Video Sessions

PD06-01: CLOVIZ: Clinical Outcomes Visualization of IMDC Criteria in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma for Patient-Centered Decision Making

Friday, May 12
9:30 AM - 9:40 AM
Location: BCEC: Room 161

Presentation Authors: Anobel Odisho*, Seattle, WA, Sumanta Pal, Duarte, CA, Michael Shapiro, Ashley Dixon, Seattle, WA, J. Connor Wells, Jose Manuel Ruiz-Morales, Calgary, Canada, Toni Choueiri, Boston, MA, Daniel Heng, Calgary, Canada, John Gore, Seattle, WA

Introduction: The International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database (IMDC) Criteria (Heng Criteria) is a validated risk prediction tool for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). It provides valuable prognostic data but clinical application can be challenging due to limited available tools. We created an interactive visualization to facilitate clinical application of IMDC Criteria.

Methods: A multi-institutional cohort of 436 patients with mRCC was used to create an interactive visualization depicting IMDC Criteria at the patient level. Usability testing was performed with non-medical lay-users and medical oncology fellows. Subjects used the tool to calculate median survival times based on IMDC Criteria in six increasingly complex clinical scenarios. Confidence using the tool was surveyed and measured along a 5-point Likert scale.

Results: The interactive visualization is available at http://www.cloviz.org. 400 lay-users and 15 medical oncology fellows completed clinical scenarios and surveys. Overall, lay-users were able to obtain the exact correct answer in 48% of scenarios, compared to 60% of medical oncology fellows. The proportion of exact correct answers decreased with increasing task complexity, but the proportion of answers within 25% of the expected answer remained stable at 68-78% for lay-users and 73-93% for medical oncology fellows. When surveying usability, 65% of lay-users felt it was easy to use, compared to 80% of fellows, and 83%-87% felt it became intuitive with increasing use, respectively. Among lay-users, 69-77% were confident selecting lab values and drug names, compared to 87-93% of medical oncology fellows. 75% of lay-users felt it helped them better understand survival in mRCC. 68% of lay-users wanted to use a similar tool with their doctor, while 87% of medical oncologists wanted to use this with patients and 93% wanted to incorporate it into their clinical practice in some way.

Conclusions: A graphical method of interacting with a validated nomogram for mRCC outcomes provides real-time individual level data that can be used by untrained nonmedical users and medical oncologists, with potential for use in the clinic setting.

Source Of Funding: Urology Care Foundation Research Scholar Fund and the Society for Urologic Oncology

Anobel Y. Odisho, MD, MPH

University of Washington

Anobel Y. Odisho MD, MPH graduated in 2009 from the University of California, San Francisco, where he also completed his Urology Residency in 2015. During residency training, he obtained a Masters of Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley in 2014. He received a Urology Care Foundation Research Scholar Award to study the impact of patient socioeconomic status on risk-adjusted readmissions rankings for hospitals. He is completing his Society of Urologic Oncology fellowship at the University of Washington. His research interests include surgical aspects of renal cell carcinoma care outcomes, risk-adjustment for evaluating policy-relevant patient and hospital level outcomes such as readmissions and creating interactive tools to visualize patient outcomes for improved shared decision-making between patients and providers.

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PD06-01: CLOVIZ: Clinical Outcomes Visualization of IMDC Criteria in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma for Patient-Centered Decision Making



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