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MP96-14: Analysis of National Trends in Hospital Acquired Conditions Following Major Urologic Surgery Before and After Implementation of the Hospital Acquired Condition Reduction Program

Tuesday, May 16
9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Location: BCEC: Room 153

Presentation Authors: Temitope Rude*, New York, NY, Nicholas Donin, Los Angeles, CA, Matthew Cohn, New York, NY, William Meeks, Scott Gulig, Linthicum, MD, James Wysock, Danil Makarov, Marc Bjurlin, New York, NY

Introduction: Hospital acquired conditions are a significant source of patient morbidity and mortality and have been targeted by recent legislation as achievable target for quality improvement. Here, we aim to define the rates of 3 most of the most common hospital acquired conditions (HACs); surgical site infection (SSI) , urinary tract infection (UTI) , and venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients who undergo major urologic surgery over a period of time encompassing the implementation of the Hospital Acquired Condition Reduction program.

Methods: Using American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data, we determined rates of HACs in patients undergoing major inpatient urologic surgery from 2005 to 2012. Rates were stratified by procedure type and approach (open vs. laparoscopic/robotic). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the association between [insert independent variable of interest] and HACs.

Results: We identified 39,257 patients undergoing major urologic surgery, of whom 2300 (5.8%) had at least one hospital acquired condition. UTI (2.58%) was the most common, followed by SSI (2.46%) and VTE (0.68%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that open surgical approach, diabetes, obesity, hypertension, congestive heart failure, BMI>30, and length of stay were associated with higher likelihood of HAC. When controlling for surgical approach, patients undergoing prostatectomy had the lowest predicted probability of HAC (PP 0.04, p<0.05) compared to patients undergoing upper tract surgery (PP 0.06) or cystectomy and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PP 0.02) We observed a non-significant secular trend of decreasing rates of HAC from 7.4% to 5.8% HAC’s during the study period, which encompassed the implementation of the CMS Hospital Acquired Condition Reduction Program.

Conclusions: HACs occurred at a rate of 5.8% during major urologic surgery, and are significantly affected by procedure type and patient health status. The rate of HAC appeared unaffected by national reduction program in this cohort. Better understanding of the non-modifiable factors associated with HACs is critical in developing effective reduction programs.

Source Of Funding: none

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MP96-14: Analysis of National Trends in Hospital Acquired Conditions Following Major Urologic Surgery Before and After Implementation of the Hospital Acquired Condition Reduction Program



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