Moderated Poster

Poster, Podium & Video Sessions

MP86-14: Prostate Specific Antigen and Health-Related Quality-of-Life Outcomes in Uninsured Men with Prostate Cancer

Monday, May 15
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Location: BCEC: Room 156

Presentation Authors: Avi Baskin*, Joseph Shirk, Lorna Kwan, Karim Chamie, Los Angeles, CA

Introduction: Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) continues to be a useful marker of risk strata and disease progression for patients with prostate cancer. While there have been multiple investigations into the relationship between PSA and mortality, there is a dearth in the literature describing the association between PSA and health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes. In this study, we hypothesize that PSA is inversely related with HRQOL in patients with prostate cancer.

Methods: Our cohort consisted of a prospective analysis of men from a state-funded program that provides free prostate cancer care to underinsured and uninsured low-income California residents with prostate cancer. Highest pre-treatment PSA was our primary exposure variable of interest. We created 4 strata: <10, 10-19.9, 20-49.9 and ≥50 PSA. The primary outcome variables were HRQOL at program enrollment using the RAND SF-12 to measure physical and mental health, and the UCLA Prostate Cancer Index Short Form to measure urinary, sexual and bowel habits in two domains: bother and function. Controlling for demographic and clinical variables, we conducted separate multivariable linear regression analysis for each quality of life domain.

Results: 627 men were eligible for the study. Age, ethnicity, primary language, education and Charlson comorbidity did not differ across PSA strata. Compared to the referent group PSA <10, those with PSA ≥50 were more likely to receive androgen deprivation therapy as their primary form of treatment (p <0.01). Patients with PSAs 10-19.9 were more likely to have sexual bother (β=11.1, p<0.03) compared to the referent group. (See Table) There were no other differences in other HRQOL domains across PSA strata.

Conclusions: In this population, we found no statistically significant difference in HRQOL outcomes by PSA level. The finding that patients with very elevated PSA levels having outcomes that were no worse than patients with less aggressive disease is important clinically because most quality of life detriments tend to be from treatment of localized disease. Further, these findings will inform physicians on patient symptomatology despite PSA level.

Source Of Funding: none

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