Moderated Poster

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MP86-05: The relationship between financial toxicity and quality of life among bladder cancer patients

Monday, May 15
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Location: BCEC: Room 156

Presentation Authors: Marianne Casilla-Lennon*, Seul Ki Cho, Allison Deal, Gopal Narang, Jeannette Bensen, Pauline Filippou, Benjamin McCormick, Raj Pruthi, Eric Wallen, Michael Woods, Hung-Jui (Ray) Tan, Matthew Nielsen, Angela Smith, Chapel Hill, NC

Introduction: Costly cancer surveillance and treatment can lead to financial toxicity (FT), an adverse financial condition as a consequence of the treatment of a disease. Evidence suggests that FT is associated with worse mortality, which may be related to impaired health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of FT with HRQOL among patients with bladder cancer.

Methods: Bladder cancer patients were identified from the University of North Carolina Health Registry/Cancer Survivorship Cohort (HR/CSC), which includes patient-reported data on FT and QOL. FT was defined as agreement with the following statement "you have to pay more for medical care than you can afford." Cancer-specific and general HRQOL was measured using the validated FACT-G, FACT-Bl and PROMIS questionnaires. Bivariate analyses were performed comparing FT and HRQOL scores using Student’s t-test.

Results: 144 bladder cancer patients were enrolled in HR/CSC, of which 138 completed the baseline questionnaire. Median age was 66.9 years. 75% were male, 89% were white, and 66% had less than a college degree. Half of patients had a stage of cT2 or higher. Thirty-three participants overall (24%) endorsed FT. With regard to general HRQOL using the PROMIS questionnaire, patients with FT had worse physical and mental health scores compared to those without FT (p=0.03 and <0.01, respectively). Patients who endorsed FT also reported lower cancer-specific QOL (72 vs. 81) as well as physical well-being (20.3 vs. 23.0) (p=0.01). Patients who endorsed FT reported lower functional well-being (14.6 vs. 17.8; p=0.05). No differences in social well-being, emotional well-being or bladder-cancer specific QOL were noted.

Conclusions: FT is negatively associated with physical and mental health-related quality of life among bladder cancer patients. Our future research will investigate the association between FT and HRQOL as affected by patient-specific characteristics such as demographics, disease stage, and comorbidities.

Source Of Funding: none

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