Moderated Poster

Poster, Podium & Video Sessions

MP76-09: PREDICTORS OF METASTASIS AT TIME OF DIAGNOSIS AND OVERALL SURVIVAL IN METASTATIC TESTICULAR CANCER

Monday, May 15
9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Location: BCEC: Room 156

Presentation Authors: Marshall Shaw*, Andrew Bachman, Alexander Parker, Brian Cross, Kelly Stratton, Michael Cookson, Sanjay Patel, Oklahoma City, OK

Introduction: Few large series in the literature examine predictors of metastatic disease at time of testicular cancer diagnosis. We performed an analysis of the National Cancer Database (NCDB) to examine predictors of metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis and overall survival (OS) based on site of metastatic disease.

Methods: Utilizing the NCDB, 44,354 patients were identified with data available for metastatic disease at time of diagnosis and tumor histology. Metastases were stratified as either absent, lymph node only, lung, brain, liver or bone metastases. Demographic characteristics, socioeconomic indicators and tumor histology were compared using the chi-squared test. Univariate survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan Meier method. Multivariate survival analysis was performed using cox proportional hazard model.

Results: Mean age of diagnosis was 35 and mean follow-up was 53 months. On univariate analysis decreased age at diagnosis (p<0.001), non-white race (p=0.002), uninsured status (p=<0.001), <$38,000 annual income (p=<0.001), distance from treating hospital (p<0.001), and pure choriocarcinoma histology (166/202, 82%, p<0.001) were associated with metastases at time of diagnosis. 3,504 (7.9%) patients had metastatic disease at diagnosis. Kaplan Meier survival analysis showed significant differences in OS between metastatic sites at presentation, with 5 yr OS of 87% for lymph node only metastases compared to 48% OS in those with brain metastases (p<0.001). On multivariate analysis while controlling for age, race, insurance status, income, comorbidities, histology, receipt of chemotherapy, and primary tumor size, metastases to any site were associated with worsened survival compared to no metastases (referent): metastasis to lymph nodes (3.4, 95% CI: 2.70-4.50, p<0.001), lung (4.48, 95% CI: 3.69-5.43, p<0.001), liver (10.32, 95% CI: 6.78-15.7), bone (12.99, 95% CI: 7.93-21.29) and brain (14.4, 95% CI: 9.53-21.89). Private insurance status (0.48, 95% CI: 0.40-0.56, p<0.001) and income >$63,000 (0.72, 95% CI: 0.60-0.87, p=0.001) were favorable predictors of OS.

Conclusions: There are significant differences in OS dependent on site of metastases at time of testicular cancer diagnosis. Several sociodemographic factors likely contribute to likelihood of metastases at presentation as well. Further prospective studies are warranted to better characterize the impact of sociodemographic factors on metastases at presentation and to improve access to care in high-risk populations.

Source Of Funding: none

Marshall Shaw, MD, MPH

My name is Marshall Shaw, MD, MPH and I am a PGY3 urology resident at the University of Oklahoma. I attended Oklahoma State University for my undergraduate education. I am interested in clinical outcomes research as well as epidemiologic studies and have extensive experience with population-based databases. I plan to pursue a career in general urology after residency in an underserviced community. I enjoy playing golf and spending time with family in my free time.

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MP76-09: PREDICTORS OF METASTASIS AT TIME OF DIAGNOSIS AND OVERALL SURVIVAL IN METASTATIC TESTICULAR CANCER



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