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MP40-13: The Impact of Perceived Stress and Health on Insomnia in Women with Overactive Bladder Symptoms

Saturday, May 13
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Location: BCEC: Room 153

Presentation Authors: K'dee Elsen, Christina Moldovan, Jim Shen, Mohamed Keheila, Salim Cheriyan, Matthew Pierce*, Andrea Staack, Loma Linda, CA

Introduction: Sleep plays a vital role in health and overall quality of life. Insomnia, the difficulty of falling/staying asleep or nonrestorative sleep, is linked to numerous impairments in every major facet of life: physical, mental, emotional, and social. Elderly women who suffer from a medical condition (e.g., overactive bladder; OAB) have been found to be at a highest risk for insomnia. Previous research has focused on the impact of OAB on insomnia, with limited research focusing on other possible contributing risk factors. We aim to study the impact of perceptions of stress and general health on insomnia, while controlling for OAB in the vulnerable population of postmenopausal women.

Methods: Fifty-seven postmenopausal female patients over the age of 57 years presenting with OAB symptoms were recruited to study lower urinary tract symptoms and overall health-related quality of life. The Perceived Stress Scale was used to measure perception of stress. Perception of general health was measured using a single-item, "In general, your health is" (1 = excellent to 5 =poor). The Insomnia Severity Index was used to measure insomnia. OAB symptoms were measured using the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire. A hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to determine the effects of perceptions of stress and general health on insomnia, while controlling for OAB symptoms.

Results: The results indicated that perceived stress and general health accounted for 45.6% of the variance in insomnia, while controlling for OAB [F (3,46) = 12.86, p < .001]. Insomnia was significantly predicted by perceptions of stress (Beta = .451, t = 2.47, p < .05) and general health status (Beta = -4.47, t = 3.84, p < .001).

Conclusions: Insomnia in OAB patients is often attributed and dismissed to symptoms, such as nocturia, that keep them awake at night; however, the results suggest that other factors, not OAB-related symptoms, can contribute to insomnia. Physicians and other healthcare professionals should screen for potential risk factors, such as perceived stress and health, in order to provide their patients the necessary resources and to increase their overall quality of life.

Source Of Funding: Grant from Versacare (#5435 to AS).

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