Moderated Poster

Poster, Podium & Video Sessions

MP32-10: Variations in the patient experience at an academic urology department: how survey results drive likelihood to recommend metrics

Saturday, May 13
9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Location: BCEC: Room 252

Presentation Authors: Richard Matulewicz*, Kalen Rimar, Kent Perry, Edward Schaeffer, Chicago, IL

Introduction: Results from patient experience surveys are an important metric of quality and patient centered care. CMS is also publicly reporting these scores and has tied them to hospital and physician reimbursement as part of its Quality Payment Program. Improvements in patient satisfaction have also been correlated with improved adherence and health outcomes for patients. Understanding the many factors that drive positive survey responses will help focus efforts for improving patient satisfaction and care.

Methods: De-identified patient surveys results collected by a third-party company after outpatient clinic visits over a 4 year period were assessed. Our outcome of interest was a "top" score on any survey question, which was defined as the highest/best possible positive response. Overall scores and individual question scores were assessed. Likelihood to recommend (LTR) scores at the department and individual surgeon level were also analyzed. The association between individual question response and LTR responses were assessed using regression analyses.

Results: Included were 39,662 individual question responses (3,428 unique patient surveys) corresponding to 11 surgeons collected from 2013-2016. The overall percentage of "top" score responses for all questions was 79.3%. Physician level results and variation are listed in Table 1. Overall, 81.8% and 80.5% of responses were "top" for LTR doctor and LTR practice, respectively (Table 2). Of the 10 unique questions asked, 4 had significant individual associations with a "top" LTR doctor response and 2 for LTR practice (Table 2) indicating greater likelihood of a LTR response if these criteria were fulfilled according to the patient.

Conclusions: There is moderate physician-level variation among patient survey responses. Certain factors, such as "time spent with doctor" and "confidence in the doctor", align more strongly than others with a "top" LTR response. Focusing attention on improving these aspects of care may improve survey response scores and patient satisfaction.

Source Of Funding: none

Send Email for Richard Matulewicz


Assets

MP32-10: Variations in the patient experience at an academic urology department: how survey results drive likelihood to recommend metrics



Attendees who have favorited this

Send Email for Variations in the patient experience at an academic urology department: how survey results drive likelihood to recommend metrics