Moderated Poster

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MP29-17: Mast Cell Subtypes: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Interstitial Cystitis

Saturday, May 13
9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Location: BCEC: Room 151

Presentation Authors: Brian Birch*, Shabana Malik, Bashir Lwaleed, Southampton, United Kingdom

Introduction: Painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the urinary bladder.

Although its pathogenesis is largely unknown, there is evidence that it is related to mast cell (MC) proliferation and activation in a subset of patients.

The objective of this study was to compare the difference in MC subtype, density, and distribution, between normal and PBS/IC bladder tissue.



Methods: Full-thickness bladder tissue was collected from patients with PBS/IC (n=14), and from patients with normal histological findings (n=4).
Samples were paraffin-embedded, and sectioned for immunohistochemistry.

Mast cell subtypes were identified using a mast cell tryptase antibody (AA1), and anti-mast cell chymase antibody (CC1).

Slides were photographed at a standard magnification, and positively stained mast cells were quantified using ImageJ software.


Results: The distribution of AA1 positive mast cells within the layers of the bladder wall of PBS/IC and control individuals is shown in figure 1.

The distribution of mast cell subtypes within the layers of the bladder wall of PBS/IC individuals is shown in figure 2.

These results showed a significant difference in the density of MCs between each layer of the bladder wall in PBS/IC tissue (p<0.05).

It was also shown that PBS/IC tissue contains a higher number of MCs compared to controls, with the largest difference in density between the two groups found in the lamina propria layer.

There is also a significant difference in the density of MC subtype (p<0.05).

Conclusions: These findings suggest that MC numbers are significantly increased in PBS/IC bladder tissue, with a significant difference in subtype and density within the layers of the bladder.

This may provide new insight into the role of MCs in PBS/IC, further our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, and develop treatment strategies.


Source Of Funding: None

Brian Birch, BA MB BChir MA MD FRCS

University of Southampton School of Medicine


Birch, Professor Brian
BA, MA, MB, BChir, MD (Cantab), FRCS (Eng)
Affiliations:
• Department of Urology University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust
• University of Southampton School of Medicine
Specialty:
• Adult urology
Sub-specialty:
• Oncology, bladder dysfunction, prostate disease, men’s sexual health
Training and education:
• Undergraduate: St Catharine’s College, Cambridge University and King’s College Hospital, London
• Postgraduate: King’s College, Bromley, Watford, High Wycombe, John Radcliffe and Eastbourne Hospitals. UCL and Institute of Urology, London and University Hospital Southampton.
Key achievements
• Recognition of aggressive nature and poor outcomes of T1 G3 bladder cancer.
• Involvement in setting up of MDR (multiple drug resistence) research group and studies into MDR in bladder cancer.
• Use of sedation reversal in local anaesthetic day-case surgery.
• Research on inflammatory bladder disease.
• Research into hypogonadism and cellular effects of testosterone on prostate cancer.
Awards and prizes
• Scholarship, St Catharine's College Cambridge University
• First class hons, Cambridge University
• 1st Prize Final FRCS Revision Course, Royal College of Surgeons
• McNeill Love Prize in Surgery, Whittington and Royal Northern Hospitals
• Everidge Research Prize in Urology, King's College Hospital
• Clifford Morson Prize, Institute of Urology
• Best Paper, Urological Research Society meeting
• Shackman Travelling Scholarship
• BUF Preceptorship

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MP29-17: Mast Cell Subtypes: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Interstitial Cystitis



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