Moderated Poster

Poster, Podium & Video Sessions

MP29-12: USE OF A BODY PAIN MAP TO CHARACTERIZE UROLOGIC CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN SYNDROME – A MAPP RESEARCH NETWORK STUDY

Saturday, May 13
9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Location: BCEC: Room 151

Presentation Authors: H. Henry Lai*, St Louis, MO, Thomas Jemielita, Philadelphia, PA, Catherine S. Bradley, Iowa City, IA, Bruce Naliboff, Los Angeles, CA, Robert Gereau IV, St Louis, MO, David A. Williams, Ann Arbor, MI, Karl Kreder, Iowa City, IA, J. Quentin Clemens, Ann Arbor, MI, Larissa V. Rodriguez, Los Angeles, CA, John N. Krieger, Seattle, WA, John T. Farrar, Nancy Robinson, J. Richard Landis, Philadelphia, PA

Introduction: Patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes (UCPPS, interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome) suffer pelvic pain and pain in other body areas. The distribution of this pain in the body and its association with other factors has not been systematically studied. We characterized the location and distribution of pain among men and women with a body map and compared urinary symptoms, non-urological factors, and psychosocial measures between UCPPS patients who reported &[Prime]pelvic pain only,&[Prime] &[Prime]pelvic pain and beyond,&[Prime] and &[Prime]widespread body pain.&[Prime]

Methods: 233 women and 191 men with UCPPS enrolled in a multi-center, one-year observational study completed a battery of measures at study entry, including a body map to report the location and distribution of their pain during the past week. Participants were categorized as having &[Prime]pelvic pain only&[Prime] if they reported pain in the abdomen and pelvis only, or &[Prime]pelvic pain and beyond&[Prime] if they reported pain outside the abdomen and pelvis. Those who reported &[Prime]pelvic pain and beyond&[Prime] were sub-grouped into the numbers of broader body regions affected by pain (1-2 regions versus 3-7 regions or &[Prime]widespread body pain&[Prime]).


Results: 25% reported pelvic pain only. 38% reported widespread body pain outside the abdomen and pelvis. As we moved from 0 region (&[Prime]pelvic pain only&[Prime]) to 1-2 regions to ≥3 body regions outside the abdomen/pelvis (&[Prime]widespread body pain&[Prime]), there is an increase in non-urologic pain (p<0.0001), more sleep disturbance (PROMIS, p=0.035), worse quality of life (SF-12 physical component: p=0.021; SF-12 mental component: p=0.001), more depression (HADS-D, p=0.005), higher anxiety (HADS-A, p=0.011), higher psychological stress (PSS, p=0.005), and higher negative affect scores (PANAS, p=0.0004), using Jonchkheere&[prime]s trend test to test for 3-group gradient. Women (but not in men) with widespread pain also reported more fatigue (PROMIS, p<0.0001) than those with pelvic pain only. For both men and women, there was no difference between the three groups in terms of their urinary symptoms (e.g., severity of pelvic pain, urinary frequency, urgency ratings, Interstitial Cystitis Symptom and Problem Indexes, Genitourinary Pain Index, pain composite score, and urinary composite score).

Conclusions: Among MAPP participants, three out of four men and women with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes (UCPPS) also report pain outside the abdomen and pelvis. Widespread body pain was associated with worse quality of life and psychosocial impacts but not worse urinary symptoms.

Source Of Funding: NIH/NIDDK MAPP (Multi-Disciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain) Research Network

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MP29-12: USE OF A BODY PAIN MAP TO CHARACTERIZE UROLOGIC CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN SYNDROME – A MAPP RESEARCH NETWORK STUDY



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