Moderated Poster

Poster, Podium & Video Sessions

MP16-07: Usefulness of inflammatory marker dynamics one month after the first-line targeted therapy initiation for PFS prediction in patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma

Friday, May 12
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Location: BCEC: Room 253AB

Presentation Authors: Keiichi Ito*, Ayako Masunaga, Saitama, Japan, Nobuyuki Tanaka, Ryuichi Mizuno, Tokyo, Japan, Suguru Shirotake, Yota Yasumizu, Hidaka, Japan, Yujiro Ito, Yasumasa Miyazaki, Tokyo, Japan, Masayuki Hagiwara, Ichikawa, Japan, Kent Kanao, Nagakute, Japan, Shuji Mikami, Tokyo, Japan, Tetsuo Monma, Wako, Japan, Ken Nakagawa, Ichikawa, Japan, Tsuyoshi Masuda, Saitama, Japan, Masafumi Oyama, Hidaka, Japan, Tomohiko Asano, Saitama, Japan, Mototsugu Oya, Tokyo, Japan

Introduction: Progression-free survival (PFS) of first-line targeted therapy (TT) greatly influences on the survival of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). If we can predict disease progression early after an administration of first-line TT, we may be able to choose appropriate targeted agent (TA) for individual patients. In the present study, we evaluated whether post-treatment inflammatory marker and LDH levels had adoptive impacts on PFS prediction in addition to conventional prognostic factors.

Methods: In this multi-institutional study 325 patients with metastatic RCC were enrolled from 8 institutions. Of these patients 215 patients whose tumors were diagnosed as clear cell type and in whom first-line TAs could be continued for more than 1 month, were selected (median follow-up period: 20.6 mo). Pretreatment clinical factors, pathological factors, and laboratory data 1 month after TA administration including inflammatory markers [neutrophil count, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte rate (NLR) and C-reactive protein (CRP)] and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), were reviewed. To identify predictors for PFS, univariate and multivariate analyses were done by cox proportional hazards model.

Results: Six TAs were used as first-line TT. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors were used for 205 patients and mTOR inhibitors for 10 patients. Nephrectomy was done for 184 patients and percutaneous needle biopsy was done for the diagnosis in 31 patients. MSKCC risk criteria was favorable in 62 patients, intermediate in 122, poor in 17, not determined in 14. The 1-year PFS rate was 47%. Univariate analysis showed that female patients, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) <80%, sarcomatoid differentiation, time from diagnosis to systemic treatment <12 months, anemia, thrombocytosis, pretreatment neutrophil count >upper limits of normal (ULN), pretreatment LDH >1.5 x ULN, LDH 1 month after TT (LDH-1M) >1.5 x ULN, pretreatment NLR >3.7, NLR 1 month after TT (NLR-1M) >3.0, pretreatment CRP >3.0 mg/dL, and CRP 1 month after TT (CRP-1M) >1.5 mg/dL, were significantly associated with PFS. In contrast, LDH decline 1M after TT, decline in neutrophil count 1M after TT, CRP decline 1M after TT, and NLR decline 1M after TT, were not significant factor even in univariate analyses. In multivariate analysis, female, KPS <80%, time from diagnosis to systemic treatment <12M, pretreatment CRP >3.0, and NLR-1M >3.0 were independent predictors for PFS. When all patients were stratified to 3 groups by these 5 factors (0 risk vs. 1 or 2 risks vs. 3 risks or more), there were significant differences in PFS rates between the groups (p<0.0001). The median time to progression was 27.6 months in 0 risk, 10.0 months in 1 or 2 risks, and 2.8 months in 3 or more risks. Furthermore, when we looked at overall survival (OS), there were also significant differences in OS rates between the groups (p<0.0001). The median OS was 58.5 months in 0 risk, 33.5 months in 1 or 2 risks, and 7.6 months in 3 or more risks.

Conclusions: Integration of NLR-1M >3.0 to pretreatment factors may lead to the establishment of effective predictive models for disease progression in patients with metastatic clear cell RCC who receive targeted argents. The absolute value of NLR appeared to be more important for PFS prediction compared to the NLR decline 1 month after targeted therapy.

Source Of Funding: None

Keiichi Ito, MD, PhD

National Defense Medical College

I am urologist in National Defense Medical College in Japan. I am specialized in renal cell carcinoma treatment, laparoscpoic surgery for urological diseases, and research for renal injury. I graduated from Keio University, School of Medicine in 1992. I had 6 year residency in Keio University (department of surgery for 2 years and departent of urology for 4 years). Then, I had research experience of tumor immunorogy between 1998 and 1999. I started working in National Defense Medical College from 1999. Next, I had an oppotunity on research associate in College Medical College (New York) between 2000-2002. I worked with Dr. Dianne Felsen, Dr. Dix P Poppas, Mrs Jie CHen, and Dr. Daraccott Vaugham Jr. I had studies about unilateral ureteral obstruction in Cornell. I returned National Defence Medical College in 2002. I continue UUO research. Also, I started laparoscopic surgery, basic and clinical reseaches about urological malignancies.

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MP16-07: Usefulness of inflammatory marker dynamics one month after the first-line targeted therapy initiation for PFS prediction in patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma



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