Water - Sustainable Amenity Design

Education Session - Presentation Format

MON-A05 - Addressing Inland Flooding and Drought Through Urban Design with Traffic Calming Synergies

Monday, October 23
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

1.5 PDH, LA CES/HSW, AIA/HSW, AICP, FL, NY/HSW

Adapting communities to climate stressors provides synergistic opportunities for public realm design improvements to include traffic calming and water management. Through a case study, we will illustrate that short-term improvements in urban livability help to dampen climate change drivers, and are components of long-term resiliency projects for future extreme scenarios.

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Learning Objectives:

Hope Hui Rising

Director
WSU Adaptive Water Urbanism Initiative/Om Creation Studio

Hope Hui Rising directs Om Creation Studio and Washington State University's Adaptive Water Urbanism Initiative. Hope has taught at the Washington State University, the Penn State University, and the University of Oregon and has conducted design research on adapting cities to sea level rise, flooding, and drought in eighteen water cities in the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, and the U.S. Prior to joining academia, Dr. Rising served as partner for a German water design company, studio lead designer for HOK Planning’s Manhattan office, and project manager and designer for AECOM/EDAW’s East Coast headquarters in Metropolitan D.C.

Presentation(s):

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Nick Bear

Associate Civil Engineer
San Francisco Public Works – Hydraulic Engineering Section

Nick Bear is a Civil Engineer specializing in combined sewer planning and analysis. Nick has focused for the last nine years on leveraging GIS and other computerized tools for this work. Most recently this has led to a local redefinition of Green Infrastructure to include multi-functional flood control projects in urban spaces. He is active in the local open space advocacy community via his involvement in the Bay Area Ridge Trail Council, Sutro Stewards, and SF Urban Riders. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering from San Francisco State University.

Presentation(s):

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Calvin Gee

Civil Engineer
San Francisco Public Works

Calvin Gee is a Civil Engineer working at the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, focusing on bicycle and pedestrian safety projects Citywide. His projects include implementation of traffic calming in residential communities, pedestrian improvements along new development corridors, and innovative bicycle infrastructure including protected facilitates and intersection treatments. Calvin has worked in the field for over 5 years, including work at the San Francisco Department of Public Works as a project engineer for various curb ramp and pavement renovation projects. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from UC Davis.

Presentation(s):

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Bimayendra Shrestha

ENGINEER
San Francisco Public Works, Hydraulic Engineering Section

Bimayendra Shrestha is a Civil Engineer specializing in urban drainage design with interest in formulating engineering problems into practical conceptual and mathematical models. He has spent over a decade analyzing and understanding the causes of urban drainage issues, and emphasizing the need for long term collaborative planning of urban landscape to minimize the future drainage problems in low-lying neighborhoods brought about by urbanization, population growth, climate change, and sea level rise. He maintains web tools for hydraulics and hydrologic calculations encountered in engineering practice. He has a Master’s degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Utah State University.

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MON-A05 - Addressing Inland Flooding and Drought Through Urban Design with Traffic Calming Synergies

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