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Education Session - Panel Format

SAT-B04 - The Academy’s Disciplinary Contribution | Research, Cases, and Connections

Saturday, October 21
2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

1.5 PDH, LA CES/non-HSW, AICP, FL, NY/non-HSW

The relationship between the academy and practice is reciprocal, the training of designers and production of knowledge occurs within both realms. This session specifically explores the role of academics and the ways in which they use pedagogy and research to identify nascent topics to evolve how the discipline operates.

Learning Objectives:

Bradley Cantrell

Chair and Professor in Landscape Architecture
University of Virginia School of Architecture

Bradley Cantrell is a landscape architect and scholar whose work focuses on the role of computation and media in environmental and ecological design. Professor Cantrell received his BSLA from the University of Kentucky and his MLA from the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He is currently an Associate Professor of Landscape Architectural Technology and a researcher in the Responsive Environments and Artifacts Lab at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. His work points to a series of methodologies that develop modes of modeling, simulation, and embedded computation that express and engage the complexity of overlapping physical, cultural, and economic systems.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Bradley Cantrell

Kristina Hill

Associate Professor
University of California, Berkeley

Hill is a designer and planner who applies ecological and geological knowledge to urban design. Her current work explores adaptation strategies for sea level rise in the San Francisco Bay Area, with a focus on biodiversity, new development approaches, and social justice. Before coming to the Bay Area, she participated in developing the regional water strategy for New Orleans in 2013 as part of a Dutch-American team. She lectures internationally on urban infrastructure and adaptation. Hill received her PhD from Harvard University, and is an associate professor at UC Berkeley in landscape architecture and environmental planning.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Kristina Hill

Elizabeth K. Meyer

Merrill D. Peterson Professor of Landscape Architecture
University of Virginia School of Architecture

Elizabeth Meyer, FASLA, is a landscape architect and theorist who has taught and published for 30 years about the affective power and hybridity of the designed landscape. Her writings deploy thick descriptions of sites and critical theories--such as sustainable beauties, racialized topographies, and socio-ecological aesthetics—to imagine new possibilities for future public landscapes. Meyer, a Professor at the University of Virginia, holds a Presidential appointment to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, a position she has held since 2012. Meyer recently founded the UVA Center for Cultural Landscapes to foster transdisciplinary research and practice on pressing landscape topics.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Elizabeth Meyer

Thaisa Way

Professor
University of Washington

Dr. Thaisa Way is an urban landscape historian teaching history, theory, and design at the University of Washington, Seattle. Her book Unbounded Practices: Women, Landscape Architecture, and Early Twentieth Century Design (UVa Press, 2009) was awarded the J.B. Jackson Book Award. Recent books include the co-edited work with Ken Yocom, Ben Spencer, and Jeff Hou (Routledge 2014) Now Urbanism: The Future City is Here and The Landscape Architecture of Richard Haag: From Modern Space to Urban Ecological Design (UW Press, 2015). Dr. Way is a Senior Fellow at the Dumbarton Oaks Garden, Landscape Studies and is Executive Director of Urban@UW.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Thaisa Way


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SAT-B04 - The Academy’s Disciplinary Contribution | Research, Cases, and Connections

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