Track 5: CANADA 150 – INDIGENOUS HERITAGE, DIVERSITY, and NEW DIRECTIONS / Volet 5: Canada 150 – Patrimoine autochtone, diversité et nouvelles orientations

Social history, erasure and built form: on recognizing the heritage of marginalized neighbourhoods/communities

Friday, October 13
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

The Tenement Museum in New York's Lower East Side in recent years has offered a powerful lesson about the compelling historic and educational value of architecturally unremarkable buildings that were long stigmatized (and then demolished) because they were seen as unworthy of preservation. Traditionally, heritage preservation has been directed at important institutional structures or the architecturally distinctive dwellings of the affluent. But growing public and academic interest in social history can and should be reflected in heritage preservation goals and practices, so we avoid erasing all traces of the built forms associated with the narratives of those who lacked capital and power.

Learning Objectives:

John Lorinc

Freelance Writer

John Lorinc is a Toronto-based journalist and editor who writes about urban affairs, business, technology and local history for various national media, including The Globe and Mail, Spacing, Toronto Star, Walrus and Maclean's. He is the author of two books on cities and has co-edited three anthologies for Coach House Books, including The Ward: The Life and Loss of Toronto's First Immigrant Neighbourhood (2015) and The Ward Uncovered: The Archeology of Everyday Life (forthcoming, spring, 2018). The Ward won the 2016 Heritage Toronto book award.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for John Lorinc

Beth Hanna

Chief Executive Officer
Ontario Heritage Trust

Beth Hanna is Chief Executive Officer of the Ontario Heritage Trust. Beth has served the public in the field of conservation for more than 30 years, working in the municipal sector before joining the Province of Ontario in 2000. She has a breadth of experience in the design and delivery of inclusive, engaging public programs and the conservation and stewardship of significant places. She works with government ministries and agencies, First Nations and Métis communities, conservation organizations and community groups, educators, funders and donors. Beth is passionate about conserving the province’s heritage, and understanding the diversity of experiences, traditions, and perspectives of its peoples and communities.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Beth Hanna


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Social history, erasure and built form: on recognizing the heritage of marginalized neighbourhoods/communities



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