Track 5: CANADA 150 – INDIGENOUS HERITAGE, DIVERSITY, and NEW DIRECTIONS / Volet 5: Canada 150 – Patrimoine autochtone, diversité et nouvelles orientations

City of Lethbridge and Blackfoot Confederacy Traditional Knowledge and Use Assessment: Understanding Indigenous Heritage and Reconciliation through Land Use Planning

Saturday, October 14
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Long-range community planning is an iterative process that involves on-going check-ins with residents, stakeholders and neighbours to ensure the high-level planning visioning and the subsequent policy framework reflects the needs, values and aspirations of a community.
2014 marked a turning point for long-range planning at City of Lethbridge with the adoption of a new Regional Plan for our watershed basin (the South Saskatchewan River watershed). The introduction of the Regional Plan, and its focus on environmental, economic and social outcomes and renewed relationships with “Aboriginal Albertans” has led us to have new conversations and do some introspection as a community about the impact of our land use and growth locally and within the watershed.

One of the new conversations that arose through this introspection was around Indigenous heritage and our relationships with neighbouring Siksikaitsitapi (Blackfoot) Nations and the City’s urban indigenous community (estimated as high as 15% of the population). In 2016, following more than a year of conversations with local leaders and Nations throughout Treaty 7 territory, the City of Lethbridge initiated one of the largest Traditional Land Use studies ever conducted by a Canadian municipality. And we didn’t do it alone, partnering with the Blackfoot Confederacy (Siksika, Piikani and Kainai First Nations) and Arrow Archaeology.

The Traditional Knowledge and Use Assessment (TKUA) takes an in-depth look at Siksikaitsitapi place-making, culture, land use and heritage within the City of Lethbridge, located at the heart of the vast Blackfoot traditional territory. The purpose of the project is to reposition the role of Indigenous heritage within the community planning process: from something that is analyzed intermittently, reactively and at the behest of higher levels of government, into something more foundational and which supports on-going long-range community planning and policy development.

The outcome of this project is broader awareness and understanding about how the Blackfoot peoples lived, used and managed the water, land and air within the place we now call Lethbridge since time immemorial. The TKUA also identifies the locations of significant indigenous heritage sites within the City, and has prompted new conversations about collaborative indigenous heritage education, interpretation and preservation.

During this presentation, City of Lethbridge Community Planners Perry Stein and Andrew Malcolm will discuss the TKUA project itself, in terms of origins, impacts and lessons learned for Indigenous heritage preservation. They will also suggest the role that this project may come to play in on-going heritage management, long-range community planning and reconciliation more generally.

We understand that more than one presenter is discouraged. However, we ask the conference approve a co-presenter with the understanding that the full conference rate will be applied. If co-presenter is not approved, please accept the abstract as a sole presenter submission by Perry Stein.

Learning Objectives:

Perry Stein

Community Planner
City of Lethbridge

Perry Stein is a Community Planner with the City of Lethbridge. His work focuses on various aspect of short and long-range planning including but not limited to redevelopment, heritage planning and the integration of regional land use plans, and community engagement. Most recently being involved in the advancement of a positive relationship with the Indigenous Peoples of the region which has been focused around the understanding of Indigenous heritage.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Perry Stein

Andrew D. Malcolm, RPP, MCIP

Community Planner
City of Lethbridge

Andrew Malcolm is a former Community Planner with the City of Lethbridge as he recently took a new opportunity as the Director of Planning and Economic Development with the Town of Taber. While with the City of Lethbridge his work focused on various aspect of short and long-range planning including but not limited to redevelopment, heritage planning and the integration of regional land use plans, and community engagement. Just prior to leaving the City of Lethbridge he was involved in the advancement of a positive relationship with the Indigenous Peoples of the region which has been focused around the understanding of Indigenous heritage.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Andrew Malcolm

Jennifer Iredale

Bio – Jennifer Iredale, MSc Historic Preservation, CAHP
Jennifer Iredale has over 35 years’ experience in the field of heritage conservation in Canada and has been instrumental in leading provincial and national heritage initiatives on youth engagement, education, environmental sustainability, and heritage tourism. Previously Director of the Heritage Branch for the Province of BC, she is currently in private practicel with her work focussing on research and writing projects. Jennifer has been recognized through several awards, most recently receiving the BC Museums Association award for’ Outstanding Achievement’.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Jennifer Iredale


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