Antibiotic Stewardship

Concurrent Education Session - 60 minutes

2309 - APIC scholars present - Facilitators and barriers to implementing interventions: Stewardship and leadership

Thursday, June 15
10:15 AM - 11:15 AM
Location: Oregon Convention Center, E 145-146

In this session, the two 2017 APIC Heroes in Implementation Research Scholars and the 2017 APIC Graduate Student Award recipient will present on their award-winning projects.

Presentations include:
Eileen Carter, PhD, RN, Columbia University and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York - Exploring Nurse Antimicrobial Stewardship - Antimicrobial resistance is a global health threat and is characterized by drug-resistant microorganisms that render antibiotics ineffective in treatment. Nurses are primarily responsible for the timely administration of antibiotics, influence prescriber decisions in initiating antibiotics, and can promptly recognize and intervene when antibiotics can be safely transitioned from the intravenous to the oral route. This presentation will describe specific nurse stewardship practices that are perceived as practical and meaningful and explore the conditions that facilitate and pose barriers to these practices.

Misha Huang, MD, Denver-Seattle Center of Innovation, Department of Veterans Affairs and University of Colorado, Aurora Barriers and Facilitators of Procalcitonin Implementation to Guide Antibiotic Use - Antibiotic overuse in hospitals is common and can result in harmful unintended consequences, including the emergence of antimicrobial resistant pathogens, adverse drug effects, and Clostridium difficile infection. The measurement of serum procalcitonin (PCT) levels has been shown in multiple clinical trials to safely reduce overall antibiotic use. However, the use of PCT has not been uniformly adopted at all hospitals. This presentation will address barriers and facilitators of PCT adoption and implementation.

Mary Jo Knobloch, MPH, PhD candidate, Madison VA and University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health - Leadership Rounds to Reduce Healthcare-associated Infections: A Case Study - This session will provide an in-depth evaluation of HAI Leadership Rounds at one facility to report “what it takes” to create a learning climate that fosters psychological safety among staff to problem-solve when adopting new guidelines, elements that may be critical for sustained evidence-based, and best practices. It will address how discovering specific leader communication behaviors and structural factors that contribute to psychological safety may be powerful in helping to move evidence to practice in reducing HAIs.

Learning Objectives:


James Davis

Senior Infection Prevention Analyst
Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority
Telford, Pennsylvania

James Davis has more than 19 years of nursing experience spanning long-term care, adult critical care, clinical decision support, education, nurse management, and infection prevention. Currently he is a senior infection prevention analyst at the ECRI Institute under contract with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority. Mr. Davis is board certified in infection control and epidemiology, is a certified healthcare environmental manager, and holds national certification in adult critical care nursing. He is an APIC Fellow (FAPIC) and currently sits on the APIC Research Committee. He has served as president of the APIC Philadelphia/Delaware Valley chapter. Mr. Davis has authored multiple infection prevention and control articles and has been published in the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority Advisory and the American Journal of Infection Control

Presentation(s):

Send Email for James Davis

Misha Huang

Health Services Research Fellow
Department of Veterans Affairs and University of Colorado
Denver, Colorado

Misha Huang is a Health Services Research Fellow at the Denver-Seattle Center of Innovation, Department of Veterans’ Affairs. She is also an Instructor at the University of Colorado, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, and is currently obtaining her Master of Science in Clinical Science degree at the University of Colorado. She is interested in the potential of novel microbiological diagnostics for impacting antimicrobial stewardship. Through her Health Services Research Fellowship experience, she was introduced to the field of Dissemination and Implementation (D&I) science, and quickly realized that the application of D&I principles to antimicrobial stewardship can be a path toward understanding and optimizing antimicrobial prescribing practices.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Misha Huang

MaryJo Knobloch

Research Health Scientist
Madison VA and University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health
Madison, Wisconsin

Mary Jo Knobloch received her degree from the University of Wisconsin (UW), School of Pharmacy, Social and Administrative Sciences, where she is pursuing her PhD. She is a research health scientist at the UW School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Infectious Disease, and the Williams S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital. She has been interested in antibiotic resistance, stewardship strategies and infection prevention since her work in a CDC-funded statewide intervention in the early 2000s via the "Get Smart" campaign. Her primary interest is bringing attention to the importance of leadership to the implementation of evidence-based and best practices.Mary Jo Knobloch received her degree from the University of Wisconsin (UW), School of Pharmacy, Social and Administrative Sciences, where she is pursuing her PhD. She is a research health scientist at the UW School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Infectious Disease, and the Williams S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital. She has been interested in antibiotic resistance, stewardship strategies and infection prevention since her work in a CDC-funded statewide intervention in the early 2000s via the "Get Smart" campaign. Her primary interest is bringing attention to the importance of leadership to the implementation of evidence-based and best practices.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for MaryJo Knobloch

Eileen Carter

Assistant Professor of Nursing; Nurse Researcher
Columbia University School of Nursing; NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital
New York, New York

Eileen Carter holds a joint appointment as Assistant Professor at Columbia University School of Nursing and Nurse Researcher at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. In this role, she promotes formal partnerships between academia and practice to further develop nursing science, with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes. Dr. Carter is an emergency department nurse by training. Her clinical experiences inform her portfolio of research, which explores and quantifies the nurses’ role in patient safety and particularly, infection control. She has received federal grant funding to support her research, which has been featured in leading peer-reviewed journals.

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Eileen Carter


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