Category: Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders

Symposium

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Hoarding Disorder

Saturday, November 18
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Indigo Ballroom E, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Hoarding | Group Therapy | Randomized Controlled Trial
Presentation Type: Symposium

Group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for hoarding disorder (HD) has been tested in only one controlled trial to date (Muroff et al., Depression and Anxiety 2014;29:597-604), in which patients received 24-28 sessions, including 4-8 home visits. The aim of the present study was to test the efficacy of group CBT using an abbreviated protocol without home visits, which is potentially more practical for routine use. Adult patients with a primary diagnosis of HD (N = 49 to date, 80% female, 8% nonwhite, M age = 54.5 years) entered a 16-week group treatment (Tolin et al., in press; A cognitive-behavioral group treatment manual for hoarding disorder, Wiley-Blackwell) that consisted of in-session sorting and discarding practice, motivational enhancement, emotion regulation training, and problem-solving training, or a 16-week wait list (WL). The primary outcome measures were the Hoarding Rating Scale-Interview (HRS-I), administered by raters blind to condition, and the self-report Saving Inventory-Revised (SI-R). Thirteen (36%) have discontinued treatment prematurely to date (5 dropped out, and 8 were withdrawn due to noncompliance with treatment procedures). Interim results from an intent-to-treat analyses using mixed model regression showed that patients receiving CBT showed a significantly greater decrease in HD severity than did those in WL on the HRS-I and on the Difficulty Discarding, Acquiring, and Clutter subscales of the SI-R (all p’s < .001). Patients receiving CBT showed an average 39% decrease on the HRS-I and a 29% decrease on the SI-R, compared to 4% and 4%, respectively, for WL. Among treatment completers, 64% of CBT patients (vs. 0% of WL patients) showed reliable change on the SI-R, and 32% of CBT patients (vs. 0% of WL patients) showed clinically significant change on the SI-R. These initial results confirm the efficacy of a brief and clinically feasible group CBT for HD. At the conference we will present the entire sample (anticipated N = 80) and describe predictor analyses.

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Hannah Levy

Post Doctoral Fellow
Anxiety Disorders Center, The Institute of Living

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Amber Billingsley

Research Assistant
Anxiety Disorders Center, The Institute of Living

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Akanksha Das

Research Assistant
Anxiety Disorders Center, The Institute of Living

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Bethany Wootton

University of New England

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Lauren S. Hallion

University of Pittsburgh

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Blaise Worden

Institute of Living

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Gretchen Diefenbach

Psychologist
Anxiety Disorders Center, The Institute of Living

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James Jaccard

New York University

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Michael C. Stevens

Senior Research Scientist
Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, The Institute of Living

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