Category: Neuroscience

Symposium

Resting State fMRI, Self-Report, and Behavioral Data to Disentangle Reward Processing in Unipolar Versus Bipolar Depression

Saturday, November 18
10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom M & N, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: Depression | Bipolar Disorder | fMRI (Function Magnetic Resonance Imaging)
Presentation Type: Symposium

Unipolar and bipolar depression is clinically indistinguishable during depressed mood state. Whereas both disorders share a propensity towards undervaluation of reward during depressed mood states, bipolar disorder is distinguished from unipolar depression by transient overvaluation of reward during (hypo)manic mood states. Examining reward processing at multiple levels of analysis may provide clues for disentangling unipolar and bipolar mood disorders, with important implications for diagnosis and treatment.

In this talk, we will present data examining both trait and state variables related to reward processing using resting state fMRI, self-report, and behavioral task data from a cohort of 35 unipolar and 24 bipolar depressed patients. Resting state functional connectivity between the anterior insula (a key neural structure implicated in interoception and approach/avoidance-related processing), and regulatory control networks implicated in emotion and behavior regulation were examined and correlated with self-report questionnaires [Behavioral Inhibition/Behavioral Activation Scale (BIS/BAS; Carver & White, 1994); Temporal Experience of Pleasure Scale (TEPS; Gard, Kring & John, 2006)]. Greater functional connectivity between anterior insula and regulatory control network structures was associated with less behavioral inhibition (BIS) and less anticipation of pleasure (TEPS-Anticipatory) in bipolar patients (p’s suggesting more adaptive reward-related outcomes with greater regulatory control of reward processing. By contrast, greater anterior insula-control network functional connectivity was associated with greater behavioral inhibition and lesser behavioral activation to reward (BAS-Reward) in unipolar patients (p’s maladaptive reward-related outcomes with greater regulatory control of reward processing. Results from two reward-related behavioral tasks [Effort Expenditure for Rewards Task (EEfRT; Treadway et al.  2009) and Probablistic Reward Task (PRT; Pizzagali et al., 2008)] and the relationship to these neural and self-report outcomes will be presented, and implications for treatment targeting will be discussed.

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Resting State fMRI, Self-Report, and Behavioral Data to Disentangle Reward Processing in Unipolar Versus Bipolar Depression



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