Category: ADHD - Adult

Symposium

What Is Meant by "Late Onset" in ADHD Populations?

Friday, November 17
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: Aqua Salon C & D, Level 3, Aqua Level

Keywords: ADHD - Adult | Assessment
Presentation Type: Symposium

“Late onset” as it relates to ADHD has been discussed numerous times in the literature (Faraone & Biederman, 2016). While new studies have provided evidence to support the validity of a late onset version of ADHD (Karam et al., 2009) there does not appear to be a standard consensus within the literature regarding how late onset is conceptualized. Is late onset a matter of when an ADHD diagnosis is made or, rather, a matter of when symptom onset begins? Is one consideration more important than the other? Indeed, there are several examples in the literature that demonstrate the multitude of ways in which “late onset” is conceptualized and analyzed (Agnew-Blais et al. 2016; Chandra et al., 2016). This presentation is intended to facilitate discussion about what “late onset” means by examining how current ADHD symptom severity and domains of impairment differ based on four categories of ADHD onset.


 


A national sample (N = 860) of adult Mechanical Turk workers with a prior ADHD diagnosis, aged 18 to 72 (M = 31.42, SD = 9.09; 55.5% female) took part in this study. Participants completed the self-report, current symptoms version of the Barkley Adult ADHD Rating Scale (BAARS-IV; Barkley, 2011). Participants were categorized based on age of diagnosis (Early diagnosis < 18 vs. Late diagnosis ≥ 18) and age of symptom onset (Early onset < 12 vs. Late onset ≥ 12): Early onset and early diagnosis (EOED), Early onset and late diagnosis (EOLD), Late onset and early diagnosis (LOED), and Late onset and late diagnosis (LOLD).


 


Participants in the EOLD group reported significantly higher levels of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity than participants in other groups. Participants in the EOED group reported more domains of impairment than participants in the LOED group, while participants in the EOLD group reported more domains of impairment than participants in other groups. Women reported significantly more domains of impairment than men. These findings demonstrate numerous differences in symptoms and impairment based on the onset of symptoms and age of diagnosis of ADHD. The presentation will include discussion of implications and future directions based on these findings.

Christopher R. Shelton

Graduate Student
University of Wyoming

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Christopher Shelton


Assets

What Is Meant by "Late Onset" in ADHD Populations?



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for What Is Meant by "Late Onset" in ADHD Populations?