Category: Dissemination / Implementation

Symposium

Associations Between Therapist Characteristics and Attitudes Toward Standardized Assessment and Routine Progress Monitoring

Sunday, November 19
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Cobalt 501, Level 5, Cobalt Level

Keywords: Implementation | Assessment
Presentation Type: Symposium

Measurement-Based Care (MBC) is an integral component of evidence-based practice (EBP) in mental health (Dozois et al., 2014), and has shown to improve outcomes (Bickman et al., 2011). Despite compelling evidence for MBC, use is rare in clinical settings (Jensen-Doss et al., 2016). Negative attitudes about EBPs are often cited as important indicators of lower use of EBPs (Jensen-Doss et al., 2009). In fact, research suggests that increases in positive attitude toward MBC is linked to increases in use (Lyon et al., 2015). In light of the urgency to understand MBC, the aim of this study was to examine predictors of therapist attitudes toward MBC.


Data were gathered from 376 surveys as part of a larger study examining large-scale policy change in Los Angeles County which fiscally-mandated the use of selective EBPs. Two-level multilevel models were employed to examine predictors of attitudes toward standardized progress (Attitudes toward Standardized Assessment Scales-Monitoring and Feedback; ASA-MF; Jensen-Doss et al., 2016) and use of monitoring and feedback (Monitoring and Feedback Attitudes Scale; MFA; Jensen-Doss et al., 2016). Predictors included demographic/professional characteristics, MBC supports/requirement, and MBC use. We hypothesized that distinct predictors would influence subscales.


Differences in demographic/professional factors predicted MFA and ASA-MF subscales. Younger age, doctoral level, lower caseloads, and MBC requirements predicted higher scores on attitudes about clinical utility and practicality. BA-level and Psychodynamic and Family-Systems therapists viewed MBC as more harmful. Therapists that reported more use of MBC during treatment viewed MBC as more harmful, but less of a time-burden to implement.


Findings suggest that multiple factors influence therapist attitudes on MBC differently for routine progress monitoring and standardized assessment. These findings inform decisions about dissemination and implementation of routine progress monitoring and feedback systems. Understanding differences in therapist behavior/motivation are important for tailoring interventions to increase use, and ultimately to improve outcomes.

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