Category: Treatment - CBT

Symposium

Community-Based Participatory Research to Inform a Church-Based Depression Intervention in Rural Michigan

Saturday, November 18
10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
Location: Aqua Salon E & F, Level 3, Aqua Level

Keywords: Depression | Cognitive Restructuring | Translational Research
Presentation Type: Symposium

Rural Americans experience depression at rates similar to urban residents; yet rural residents are significantly less likely to receive mental health treatment. This is in part due to substantial barriers to care in rural communities, the most significant of which may be mental health provider shortages. Given well-established access challenges, it is imperative to explore non-mental health settings in underserved rural areas that could offer evidence-based depression care. This study presents community-based research conducted to inform the adaptation of group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression for delivery in rural churches.


A mixed method pilot study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of church-based CBT for depression in rural Michigan. We conducted focus groups and interviews with 21 clergy to explore their understanding of depression, experiences working with depressed persons, and perceptions of church-based group CBT, and surveyed congregants at two churches (N=63; 63% response rate) to assess depressive symptoms, help seeking preferences, and perceptions of a church-based group depression program. Thematic analysis of qualitative research with clergy revealed: clergy view depression as a serious community concern but feel underprepared to help depressed persons; clergy feel their approach to supporting depressed persons (scripture on positive thinking; encouragement) aligns with CBT elements; and with training and support, clergy are interested in facilitating technology-assisted group CBT. Congregant survey results found 13% of respondents screened positive for Major Depressive Disorder; another 24% had mild to moderate depressive symptoms. Only 22% of congregants indicated they would seek help from mental health professionals, whereas strong preference for seeking help from clergy, family, and friends was reported. 67% of respondents would consider attending a church-based group program for depression.


This preliminary work informed and provided support for beginning development and testing of Raising Our Spirits Together, a 10-session computer-assisted CBT for depression facilitated by clergy and delivered in rural churches.

Addie Weaver

Assistant Professor
University of Michigan

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Addie Weaver


Assets

Community-Based Participatory Research to Inform a Church-Based Depression Intervention in Rural Michigan



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for Community-Based Participatory Research to Inform a Church-Based Depression Intervention in Rural Michigan