Category: Dissemination / Implementation

Symposium

Interpersonal Therapy-Adolescent Skills Training May Inform Adaptations for Adolescents From Low-Income Immigrant Families

Sunday, November 19
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom B, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: Adolescent Depression | School | Cross Cultural / Cultural Differences
Presentation Type: Symposium

EBPs for adolescent depression have been developed and tested extensively in middle class, European-American samples (Garber, 2006). However, few studies have assessed potential therapy process differences across culture and class. This study uses qualitative methods to examine themes emerging in the implementation of Interpersonal Therapy–Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), which cultivates teen communication skills to reduce depressogenic interpersonal stress. We hypothesized that themes related to “hard interdependence” would emerge in sessions with teens from low-income immigrant families whereas “expressive independence” themes would emerge in session with middle class European American teens (Stephens, Markus & Phillips, 2013).


IPT-AST was delivered to teens at-risk for depression in: School 1 serving teens from mostly low-income Vietnamese and Latino immigrant families, and School 2 serving mostly middle class, European-American teens. 131 IPT-AST sessions were transcribed for analysis. We used qualitative coding, consensus and comparison methodology to identify themes in session transcripts.


Five groups of themes arose. 1) Interpersonal goals ranged in nature, from spending more time with parents, to reducing conflict, to improving trust. 2) Interpersonal problems were classified into conflict, distance/estrangement and worries about loved ones. 3) Coping strategies included engaged vs. disengaged approaches. 4) Cultural values fit under interdependence and independence themes. 5) Teens described barriers to enacting IPT-AST skills (e.g., discomfort, dislike, low mastery). Consistent with hypotheses, preliminary results suggest that youth from School 1 report more: modest treatment goals, distance in parent-teen relations, interdependent values and barriers to enacting skills for expressing feelings and personal desires.


 Culture and class may influence the content teens bring to EBP sessions and whether/how they apply skills learned. Knowledge about these differences in therapeutic process suggest potential adaptations of EBPs involving communication skills in low-income immigrant families.

Send Email for Tamar Kodish


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