Category: Health Psychology / Behavioral Medicine - Child

Symposium

Pilot Trial and Three-Month Follow-Up of a DBT Skills Group for Subclinical Binge Eating Among Adolescents

Saturday, November 18
1:45 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom B, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: DBT (Dialectical Behavior Therapy) | Eating | Adolescents
Presentation Type: Symposium

Subclinical binge eating disorder (BED) symptoms can lead to additive physical and psychological health challenges and put youth at risk for developing full threshold BED in early adulthood. The affect regulation model, which posits overeating as an attempt to regulate emotions, is an explanatory model for subclinical and clinical binge eating, and is consistent with a Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) approach to treating BED. We examined a condensed DBT skills intervention for subclinical binge eating behaviors in adolescents. Eleven 14-18 year olds (Mage = 15.40 years; 100% Black; 64% Female; MBMI = 98%ile) participated in a 10 week DBT skills group, which experientially introduced mindfulness, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness in the context of dysregulated eating. Adolescents and caregivers completed baseline, post intervention, and 3-month follow up measures including: Emotional Eating Scale for Children and Adolescents (EES-C), Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, and ASEBA Youth Self-Report (YSR)/Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL).Mean scores were compared at all three time points. Decreases in emotional eating were observed on the EES-C self-report from baseline to post (Δ = 6.91; Cohen’s d = 0.42) and baseline to follow up (Δ = 4.82; d = 0.33), and caregiver report from baseline to post (Δ = 8.46; d = 0.80) and baseline to follow up (Δ = 16.55; d = 1.53). Self-reported mean binges per month decreased from baseline to post (Δ = 3.27; d = 0.94) and baseline to follow up (Δ = 3.00; d = 0.84), and caregiver report of youth’s mean binges decreased from baseline to post (Δ = 6.64; d = 0.86) and baseline to follow up (Δ = 6.91; d = 0.90). Total problem scores on the YSR decreased from baseline to post (Δ = 4.37; d = 0.62) and baseline to follow up (Δ = 4.00; d = 0.59), and on the CBCL from baseline to post (Δ = 6.18; d = 0.63) and baseline to follow up (Δ = 8.54; d = 0.92).Findings support the preliminary efficacy of a condensed DBT skills group curriculum for decreasing binge eating behaviors and improving overall psychological functioning among adolescents, as well as maintenance of treatment gains over 3 months.

Rebecca Kamody

Doctoral Student/Pre-doctoral Clinical Psychology Intern
University of Memphis/Yale Child Study Center

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Pilot Trial and Three-Month Follow-Up of a DBT Skills Group for Subclinical Binge Eating Among Adolescents



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