Category: Research Methods and Statistics

Symposium

Using the Differential Time-Varying Effect Model to Examine Timing Effects of Interventions

Sunday, November 19
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Aqua 300 A & B, Level 3, Aqua Level

Keywords: Research Methods | Statistics | Longitudinal
Presentation Type: Symposium

With increasing research suggesting that early response to intervention predicts the degree of change within treatment, examining timing-effects within the context of therapy is becoming increasingly important. However, current strategies are unable to examine the impact of each treatment session on treatment change. Additionally, due to limitations of traditional methods, most research on therapy timing effects assume that a construct has a linear effect on the outcome and does not examine non-linear impacts on change.


The current research will use the Differential Time-Varying Effect Model (DTVEM) to examine the linear and non-linear timing effects of an intervention on treatment change. An empirical example will illustrate the timing effects of a behavioral ecological momentary intervention in producing reliable change in personality traits in 74 participants. Participants within this intervention were given feedback across 25 different personality measures and were asked to choose a personality trait that they would like to change. Behavioral treatment included brief psychoeducation surrounding behavioral modification techniques, followed by an ecological momentary intervention applying these behavioral strategies within their daily life. The results of this technique showed that a high degree of behavioral modification strategies within the first day of the treatment strongly predicted reliable change, but the results showed that usage at moderate to low levels did not predict treatment outcome. Further, the results showed that the effects were unique to the first day of the ecological momentary intervention, and the results showed that high use of behavioral modification strategies did not significantly predict reliable change in personality later in treatment. In showing unique non-linear timing effects during the first day of treatment, these results highlight DTVEM’s ability to uncover non-linear timing of treatment effects.

Nicholas C. Jacobson

Graduate student
The Pennsylvania State University

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