Category: Adult Depression / Dysthymia

Symposium

Internet-Delivered Cognitive Control Training as a Preventative Intervention for Depression

Friday, November 17
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Indigo Ballroom E, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Depression | Prevention | Technology / Mobile Health
Presentation Type: Symposium

Cognitive control impairments place individuals at risk for depression by disrupting emotion regulation processes. Given that cognitive control impairments are known to predict future depressive symptomatology in remitted depressed (RMD) patients, we explored whether online cognitive control training can be used as an intervention to foster resilience to depression following remission.


We present results of a pre-registered double-blind randomized controlled trial study. 68 RMD patients performed ten sessions of internet-delivered cognitive control training or a low cognitive load training (active control condition). Effects of training were assessed following two weeks of training and at three months follow-up. Primary and secondary outcome measures contained several indicators of vulnerability for depression.


We observed beneficial effects of cognitive control training on cognitive task performance immediately following two weeks of training and at three months follow-up (ηp² = .36). Furthermore, completers of the training reported a reduction in cognitive complaints (ηp² = .09). Taking into account intention-to-treat, beneficial effects of cognitive control training were found for both primary outcome measures, depressive rumination (ηp² = .13) and depressive symptomatology (ηp² = .18). Moreover, training effects on depressive rumination mediated the relation between change in cognitive control and future depressive symptoms (B= -0.04; 95% CI [-0.10, -0.01]). Cognitive control training also yielded positive effects on secondary outcome measures for maladaptive emotion regulation (ηp² = .15), residual symptomatology (ηp² = .15), and resilience (ηp² = .16). Additionally, completers of the training procedure reported beneficial effects on disability (ηp² = .11).


These novel findings confirm the preventative potential of internet-delivered cognitive control training for remitted depressed patients, reducing cognitive vulnerability for depression and stimulating resilience. These findings will be discussed within the light of recent insights stemming from a systematic review of the state-of-the-art cognitive control training literature.


 

Kristof Hoorelbeke

PhD student
Ghent University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Kristof Hoorelbeke


Assets

Internet-Delivered Cognitive Control Training as a Preventative Intervention for Depression



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for Internet-Delivered Cognitive Control Training as a Preventative Intervention for Depression