Category: Dissemination / Implementation

Symposium

Individualized Progress Measures: More Acceptable to Clinicians Than Standardized Progress Measures

Sunday, November 19
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Cobalt 501, Level 5, Cobalt Level

Keywords: Implementation | Assessment
Presentation Type: Symposium

Despite evidence that measurement-based care (MBC) based on standardized progress measures improves client outcomes, these measures are rarely used in practice (e.g., Ionita & Fitzpatrick, 2014). An alternative drawn from the behavioral assessment tradition that might be more acceptable to clinicians is individualized progress measures of client-specific targets. However, little is known about the acceptability or prevalence of individualized progress measure use.


In a national survey of 504 primarily (85.0%) masters-level clinicians working in various settings (67.7% private practice, 18.6% mental health agencies, 4.6% schools, 9.1% other), we compared attitudes toward standardized and individualized progress measures, as well as rates of use. Participants completed the Attitudes Toward Standardized Assessment Scales- Measurement Feedback (ASA-MF; Jensen-Doss et al., in press) and a modified ASA-MF reworded to ask about individualized progress monitoring. Clinicians reported neutral to positive attitudes toward both types of measures, but strongly preferred individualized measures when directly comparing the two on a range of dimensions, including their acceptability (70.8% said individualized were better, 4.9% said standardized, 24.3% said they were the same) and relevance to clients (78.3% individualized, 4.4% standardized, 17.3% same). Clinicians were significantly more likely to use individualized progress measures (40.3% used at least monthly, 23.1% used < once a month, 36.6% never) than standardized progress measures (13.9% at least monthly, 24.6% < once a month, 61.5% never). Providers working in private practice were significantly less likely to use standardized measures than individuals working in other settings and providers with cognitive-behavioral theoretical orientations were more likely to use individualized measures than other providers. These findings suggest that, taking into account individualized progress measures, clinicians are engaging in MBC at a higher rate than previously thought, although practices vary by work setting and theoretical orientation. Implications for dissemination and implementation of MBC will be discussed.

Amanda Jensen-Doss

Associate Professor
University of Miami

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