Category: Suicide and Self-Injury

Symposium

Implicit Association With Suicide as Measured by the Suicide Affect Misattribution Procedure Predicts Suicide Ideation

Saturday, November 18
12:15 PM - 1:45 PM
Location: Aqua Salon A & B, Level 3, Aqua Level

Keywords: Suicide
Presentation Type: Symposium

Recent investigations have been conducted to determine if implicit association to suicide and death may serve as an important indirect marker of suicide risk (Glenn et al., 2017). The current investigation aimed to further this line of research through the adaptation of a suicide-specific version of the Affect Misattribution Procedure (AMP; Payne et al., 2005) which utilizes sequential priming techniques to test implicit attitudes toward pictorial stimuli.


Participants were 138 students (68.12% female; M=19.25; 70.29% Caucasian) from a state university who were oversampled for suicide ideation. Twenty-three participants (16.67%) indicated some level of suicide ideation in the two weeks prior to participation. Participants completed an adapted version of the Suicide-AMP (S-AMP) and self-report measures of suicidal ideation and symptoms of depression. The completion of the S-AMP and self-report measures were counterbalanced.


Suicide ideation was positively correlated to suicide S-AMP ratings (r = .24, p < .05) and symptoms of depression (r = .52, p < .001) but unrelated to positive and negative S-AMP ratings. Both suicide S-AMP ratings and symptoms of depression were positive predictors of suicide ideation status when analyzed in the same step of a logistic regression model (χ2(1) = 38.14, p < .001; 83.30% correctly classified). In a zero-inflated poisson regression model, both suicide S-AMP ratings (β = .06, S.E. = .03, p = .04) and symptoms of depression (β = .13, S.E. = .03, p < .001) positively predicted suicide ideation when analyzed in the same step.


This research furthers the literature regarding the indirect measurement of suicide risk, an important avenue for psychological research according to the NIMH. Specifically, this study provides continued support for the assessment of implicit association to suicide as an important indirect marker of suicide ideation. Continued refinement of the S-AMP may assist in the assessment and prediction of suicide without relying on self-reported suicidal thinking. The S-AMP may also be particularly useful because the task is highly mobile, easy to score, and takes little time to complete.

Raymond P. Tucker

Assistant Professor
Louisiana State University

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