Category: Gay / Lesbian / Bisexual / Transgender Issues

Symposium

General and Transgender-Specific Predictors of Affect in a Daily Diary Study of Transgender Men and Women

Friday, November 17
1:45 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom B, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: L / G / B / T | Cognitive Processes
Presentation Type: Symposium

Purpose: Research on mental health disparities for transgender populations has increased over recent years, highlighting the need to examine both general and minority specific processes impacting mental health.

Methods: Participants included 35 transgender men and 12 transgender women (N=47), ranging in age from 16-40 years old (mean=26). Participants completed surveys daily for 8 weeks, reporting on their affect (positive, negative, and anxious), as well as general (isolation and rumination) and trans-specific experiences (internalized transphobia and gender affirmation-or, feeling socially affirmed in one’s gender) hypothesized to predict affect. Participants also provided qualitative responses about their ruminative thoughts.

Results: Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that isolation, rumination, and internalized transphobia predicted positive affect, although there was not a significant association with gender affirmation. This same pattern of findings was found for negative affect, with isolation, rumination, and internalized transphobia again significant. Lastly, isolation, gender affirmation, and rumination were significant predictors of anxious affect, although there was not a significant association with internalized transphobia.

Conclusions: This examination of affect and general and trans-specific factors revealed that isolation and rumination were consistent predictors of positive, negative, and anxious affect. In contrast, the trans-specific predictors were selectively associated with affect. Gender affirmation appeared to be especially important to understanding anxious affect whereas internalized transphobia played a role in positive and negative affect. These findings have implications for clinicians’ understandings of the differential effects minority specific processes have on affect.

Jae Puckett

Assistant Professor
University of South Dakota

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General and Transgender-Specific Predictors of Affect in a Daily Diary Study of Transgender Men and Women



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